Rialto

03.24.2011 Rialto Comments Off on North Rialto Poised For New Development

North Rialto Poised For New Development

Rialto, California's north end is nestled at the base of the San Gabriel Mountains. North of the 210 Freeway it has many parcels of vacant land with easy freeway access and suitable for industrial or commercial development. Photo by Chris Sloan

Rialto has hundreds of acres of vacant land, zoned for industry, near the Alder off-ramp of 210 Freeway. Photo by Chris Sloan

The City of Rialto plans in the near future to convert Rialto Airport to Renaissance Rialto, a commercial and residential planned development. Nearby, hundreds more acres of vacant land are also suitable for commercial development. Photo by Chris Sloan

(RIALTO, Calif.) As the economy gains strength, the City of Rialto is encouraging developers to look to the north end of the city, where large parcels of land near the 210 Freeway are suitable for business or industry.

“Along the 210 Freeway, we have lots of land poised for full development,” said Robb Steel, Director of the Rialto Redevelopment Agency. “This is especially true of the areas north of the freeway near the Ayala and Alder interchanges.”

“Many areas west of here are approaching buildout,” Steel noted. “That means Rialto is a great place to grow a business in southern California.”

The Ayala properties are near what is currently the Rialto Airport, but will soon become Renaissance Rialto, a 1,500-acre master planned community.

The Rialto City Council recently approved a specific plan and environmental impact report for Renaissance Rialto. This clears the way for developer Lewis-Hillwood Rialto to market industrial, retail and residential sites when market conditions improve.

“With those homes and others nearby in the preliminary planning stage, we would like to see businesses come into the community to serve the future residents, as well as thousands who already live near the 210 Freeway and farther north,” Steel said.  “It will soon become a growing area. Our goal is to make it a commercial center to serve all residents of Rialto and surrounding communities.”

The 210 Freeway interchange at Alder Avenue is an already established industrial park, and the City hopes this area will expand due to the close 210 Freeways’ close proximity..

About Rialto

Although the City of Rialto is located in the middle of one of the nation’s fastest growing regions, it has retained a small town atmosphere and similar quality of life. Rialto is an ethnically diverse and progressive community, which boasts several unique community assets including its own police and fire departments, a city-owned fitness center, performing arts theater, nine beautiful parks, a community center and senior center. Rialto is within easy range of mountains, beaches, deserts and other recreational areas.

Rialto’s housing mix and home costs are some of the most affordable in Southern California. First-time homebuyers find Rialto more affordable than almost any other comparable community in the region. Executives and those seeking high-end residences also find they can purchase much more home for their money in Rialto. This lower cost translates into more discretionary income for residents, thus benefiting retailers and service providers.

For more information about Rialto, go to www.rialtoca.gov or call (909) 879-1140.

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03.15.2011 Rialto Comments Off on Rialto Easing Congestion With New Freeway Bridge

Rialto Easing Congestion With New Freeway Bridge


Work has begun to ease congestion on the Riverside Avenue bridge over Interstate 10 in Rialto. Harber Construction workers Saul Castenoa, Jacob Gracia, Janie Barralaga amd Bruce Siekierski remove the railing of the old bridge. The City of Rialto will close this five-lane bridge in April to replace it with a nine-lane bridge. It anticipates finishing the project in early 2012. Photo by Chris Sloan

The new freeway bridge soon to be built over Interstate 10 at Riverside Avenue in Rialto will resemble the Rialto Bridge in Venice, Italy. It and the freeway on and off-ramps at Riverside Avenue will also contain features reflecting Rialto's history as a place where citrus was grown and packed.

(RIALTO, Calif.) Driving on Riverside Avenue over or onto Interstate 10 will soon be easier as the City of Rialto has begun work to widen Riverside Avenue at its intersection with the freeway.

“This interchange has experienced high traffic for years,” said Robb Steel, director of the Rialto Redevelopment Agency. “This creates a safety hazard, as well as long delays.”

The Redevelopment Agency is financing most of the $32 million project. State and federal funds make up the balance, and also will partially reimburse the Redevelopment Agency’s $30 million up-front contribution.

Revenue generated by Measure I, a half-cent sales tax approved by San Bernardino County voters in 2009, also will reimburse a portion of the Redevelopment Agency’s costs.

The City of Rialto’s intersection widening project coordinates with the ongoing California Department of Transportation project to widen the on and off-ramps at the Riverside interchange.

Rialto is working in partnership with the California Department of Transportation and San Bernardino County Associated Governments to complete this $32 million project. When complete, it will replace the existing five-lane bridge with one featuring nine lanes, including two left-turn lanes in either direction.

The new bridge and ramps will give travelers a taste of Rialto’s history. “This is the only interchange on Interstate 10 that is completely within Rialto’s city limits,” Steel said. “The City wants to make sure it showcases Rialto in an attractive way.”

The bridge itself will be fashioned in the style of the Rialto Bridge in Venice, Italy, which is depicted in Rialto’s City seal. Under the bridge, travelers along Interstate 10 will see decorative walls incorporating the city seal. This seal will also decorate the ends of the bridge’s support columns.

When entering or exiting a ramp facing Valley Boulevard, travelers will see walls featuring oranges and grapes, in a nod to Rialto’s early history as a center for packing houses.

The first phase of this project is to replace the existing one-lane on and off-ramps with two-lane ramps. The existing ramps will remain open during the project, except for brief closures (usually between 10 p.m. and 4 a.m.)

Construction of the bridge itself is expected to take about seven months, beginning in April. During this time, traffic will detour by taking either Valley Boulevard or Slover Avenue to Cedar Avenue, or by taking Rancho Avenue and Agua Mansa Road to continue south on Riverside Avenue. Drivers may also use the Interstate 10 on and off-ramps, provided they can access them without crossing over the freeway.

After the finishing touches, which include installing new signals and painting new lane stripes, the City of Rialto will hold a dedication ceremony for this project. The goal is to have everything completed in early 2012.

The Rialto Interchange is one of several projects the Rialto Redevelopment Agency is currently funding. Others include:

  • $15 million to extend Pepper Avenue to the 210 Freeway, opening up 175 acres for future economic development.
  • $5.8 million to replace the fire station that was at 1925 N. Riverside Avenue. The new fire station will have modern features, allowing firefighters and paramedics to better serve Rialto residents.
  • $7 million to improve Fergusson Park, including creating two new football fields.
  • $2.4 million to relocate utilities and upgrade infrastructure on the old, recently demolished fire station property, making the freeway-frontage location suitable for new commercial development.
  • $2 million for construction of 75 units of senior housing on Foothill Boulevard.
  • $1 million to expand the Rialto Library and add a new computer lab.

“The Rialto Redevelopment Agency has an aggressive redevelopment program to reshape the community and help both businesses and residents,” Steel said.

For more information about how the Rialto Redevelopment Agency can help a business to upgrade, expand or relocate within the city, contact Robb Steel at (909) 879-1140.

About Rialto

Although the City of Rialto is located in the middle of one of the nation’s fastest growing regions, it has retained a small town atmosphere and similar quality of life. Rialto is an ethnically diverse and progressive community, which boasts several unique community assets including its own police and fire departments, a city-owned fitness center (see their yourelliptical schwinn review), performing arts theater, nine beautiful parks, a community center and senior center. Rialto is within easy range of mountains, beaches, deserts and other recreational areas.

Rialto’s housing mix and home costs are some of the most affordable in Southern California. First-time homebuyers find Rialto more affordable than almost any other comparable community in the region. Executives and those seeking high-end residences also find they can purchase much more home for their money in Rialto. This lower cost translates into more discretionary income for residents, thus benefiting retailers and service providers.

For more information about Rialto, go to www.rialtoca.gov or call (909) 879-1140.

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Media:  If you would like any of the photos in the slide show below please send an email to Chris@DameronCommunications.com with the photo id number and i will have it to you within 24 hours.  If you require the photo sooner please call Chris Sloan at (909) 888-0017.

03.11.2011 Rialto Comments Off on Overcoming Challenges Through Strength

Overcoming Challenges Through Strength

The Rialto Women’s Conference featured a panel discussion by four female elected officials – Rialto Unified School District Board Member Joanne Gilbert, Fontana Mayor Acquanetta Warren, San Bernardino County Fifth District Supervisor and Board Chairman Josie Gonzales and California Assembly Member Wilmer Amina Carter. Photo by Chris Sloan

Anita Iglesias, senior accounting assistant for the City of Rialto; Milele Robertson, associate transportation planner for the California Department of Transportation; and Lelia “Charli” Harris, a media arts major at California State University, Dominguez Hills, formed a second panel at the Rialto Women’s Conference. These women are graduates of Rialto’s Bethune Center, where as high school students they learned job-seeking and career development skills. The Bethune Center’s sponsor, the Inland Empire Chapter of the National Council of Negro Women, co-hosted this conference. The conference host, Deborah Robertson, is the mother of Milele Robertson and grandmother of Lelia Harris. Photo by Chris Sloan

Rialto Council Member Deborah Robertson, along with City Clerk Barbara McGee and the Inland Empire chapter of the National Council of Negro Women, hosted a women’s conference at the Rialto Senior Center on Saturday, March 5. At the conference, four female elected officials and three young women shared how their strengths have helped them achieve. Photo by Chris Sloan

(RIALTO, Calif.) Rialto celebrated Women’s History Month on Saturday, March 5 by examining what local women have done, and still need to do, to improve life in the Inland Empire.

The Fifth Annual Rialto Women’s Conference highlighted the contributions of four women who currently serve as elected officials representing the Inland Empire, and three younger women.  These seven women made up two panels whose discussions tied into the national Women’s History Month celebration theme of “Our History, Our Strength.”

The elected officials were State Assembly Member Wilmer Amina Carter, San Bernardino County Fifth District Supervisor and Board Chairman Josie Gonzales, Fontana Mayor Acquanetta Warren and Rialto Unified School District Governing Board Member Joanne Gilbert. These women shared how they serve their community in their elected office, what challenges they have faced, and what they hope for the future.

State Senator Gloria Negrete McLeod had also been confirmed to speak at the conference, but did not attend because of a family illness.

Rialto Unified School District voters re-elected Gilbert to the Board of Trustees in November. Although she received the highest number of votes, and almost 1,000 more than any other candidate, Gilbert said she wasn’t certain of her re-election during the campaign.

“By electing me, we were able to maintain a female voice on the Rialto school board,” Gilbert said. “It is very important that we maintain diversity, because while we have done much for our students, we are still striving for excellence.”

Gilbert also noted voter support of Measure Y, which allows Rialto Unified School District to obtain funding for school modernization, will help the district to improve children’s education.

Voters elected Mayor Warren as Fontana’s first-ever Black mayor in November. She had previously served on the Fontana City Council since 2002.

During the conference, Warren emphasized the importance of all women working with each other to improve their communities.

“As women, we all have to help each other,” she said. “Women make the difference, but we are not active enough. If we don’t stand up for what we believe, the result could be bad for everyone.”

Warren urged all women attending the conference to be concerned not only about their own communities, but all of the Inland Empire, and to be advocates for their families.

“We have to take those little jewels we are raising and make sure they get what they need,” she said. “We only have one chance. If we don’t get it right, we will leave behind a generation of uneducated, uninformed and illiterate people.”

Supervisor Gonzales also urged women to support each other. She likened a network of people who work for each other’s best interests to a warm blanket.

“A continuum of support keeps us warm and safe,” she said. “It takes every single one of us, and the God-given strengths we have been blessed with.”

Gonzales acknowledged needing support from others recently, including the only other woman on the Board of Supervisors, Second District Supervisor Janice Rutherford. Without Rutherford’s support, and that of Fourth District Supervisor Gary Ovitt, Gonzales would not have been elected chairman of the Board of Supervisors in January.

“There is a brick wall that is camouflaged as a door,” she said. “Prejudice still exists in 2011.”

Gonzales urged women to overcome prejudice they face, for whatever reason, by exerting the same reliance on support from others as she does.

“We’re not quitters,” she said. “To get what you need, figure out who you need to network with. Who do you need to identify with to build a base of strength?”

“You are intelligent. You are strong. I am proud to count myself among you,” she said.

Assembly Member Carter urged women to focus on the needs of a larger area, the entire state of California. She also assured participants the state government can still be a resource in helping to meet residents’ needs.

“We don’t have any money right now, but I still serve, and I still can provide some hope,” she said. “We still have resources. My job is to find them and bring them to you. I serve the whole state. What works for one district works for the whole state.”

National Council of Negro Women Inland Empire Chapter President Lois Carson moderated the elected official’s panel discussion. Carson, the recently retired executive director of Riverside County Community Action Partnership, is herself a former elected official, having served as a member of the San Bernardino Valley College Board of Trustees.

Rialto Council Member Deborah Robertson and City Clerk Barbara McGee hosted the conference, along with the Inland Empire Chapter of the National Council of Negro Women.

Susan Doyle, executive director of the chapter’s Bethune Center in Rialto, moderated the younger women’s discussion. These women, who took part in the Bethune Center’s job preparation program as high school students, shared how that program has shaped their careers since then.

Deborah Robertson’s daughter Milele Robertson, associate transportation planner with the California Department of Transportation, and her granddaughter Lelia “Charli” Harris, a media arts major at California State University, Dominguez Hills, were two of the three speakers on the panel. Anita Iglesia, a senior accounting assistant for the City of Rialto, also spoke.

For Deborah Robertson, the Women’s Conference was a family event. Not only did she host, and two members of her family speak, but her mother, two toddler-aged granddaughters and their mother also were among the approximately 120 women who attended.

Other female elected officials attending include Rialto Mayor Grace Vargas who gave a welcome address, and council members Susan Olivas of Colton, Debbie Franklin of Banning and Lydia Wilbert of Fontana.

About Rialto
Although the City of Rialto is located in the middle of one of the nation’s fastest growing regions, it has retained a small town atmosphere and similar quality of life. Rialto is an ethnically diverse and progressive community, which boasts several unique community assets including its own police and fire departments, a city-owned fitness center, performing arts theater, nine beautiful parks, a community center and senior center. Rialto is near mountains, beaches, deserts and other recreational areas.

Rialto’s housing mix and home costs are some of the most affordable in the southern California region. First-time homebuyers find Rialto more affordable than almost any other comparable community in the region. Executives and those seeking high-end homes also find they can purchase much more home for their money in Rialto. This lower cost translates into more discretionary income for residents, thus benefiting retailers and service providers.

For more information about Rialto, go to www.rialtoca.gov or call (909) 820-2525.

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Media:  If you would like any of the photos in the slide show below please send an email to Chris@DameronCommunications.com with the photo id number and I will have it to you within 24 hours.  If you require the photo sooner please call Chris Sloan at (909) 888-0017.

03.02.2011 Rialto Comments Off on From Blight To Burgers

From Blight To Burgers

A bulldozer finishes tearing down a dilapidated and abandoned fire station at 1925 N. Riverside Ave. It will now begin a project to upgrade infrastructure on the property, to make it suitable for new development. The City will soon also build a new fire station. Photo by Chris Sloan

The City of Rialto has torn down a dilapidated and abandoned fire station at 1925 N. Riverside Ave. It will now begin a project to upgrade infrastructure on the property, to make it suitable for new development. The City will soon also build a new fire station. Photo by Chris Sloan

(RIALTO, Calif.) An abandoned fire station has given way to what is expected to soon become a hub of restaurants, starting when In-N-Out Burger opens a new location on Riverside Avenue near the 210 Freeway in Rialto.

In-N-Out Burger has already committed to establishing a restaurant at 1925 N. Riverside Ave. Local developer Fernando Acosta is working to bring in two more restaurants. “Three new restaurants off the freeway at Riverside Avenue will bring economic benefit to the City of Rialto, from the sales the restaurants make, from the enhanced value of the property, and from the jobs many young people will have working in these restaurants” said Mayor Grace Vargas. “In-N-Out Burger by itself will create about 60 new jobs.”

“They also make Rialto a better place to live, by giving our residents more options for casual dining,” Vargas said.

“Taking abandoned properties, which are considered blighted, and turning them into something that benefits a city is the key purpose of redevelopment agencies,” Redevelopment Agency Director Robb Steel said. “Without our help, private development of this highly valuable property would have been unlikely for the foreseeable future.”

“The abandoned building is too close to the freeway to be used safely as a fire station,” Steel said. “The property around the fire station was actually three parcels that had been cut up by the freeway onramp and the reconfiguration of Highland Avenue.”

“No one could use this location without the major infrastructure upgrades taking place, Steel continued. “This property was too valuable to the city to let it simply go to waste. That’s why the Rialto Redevelopment Agency is making the investment to transform this into a useable location.”

“After we moved forward with our plans to develop this property, In-N-Out Burger committed to coming here. Since then, other restaurants have contacted the Redevelopment Agency to express their interest in doing business at the same location,” Steel said.

The City of Rialto Redevelopment Agency is investing about $2.4 million in the project. It has already purchased some of the property adjacent to the fire station from the California Department of Transportation. It then demolished the fire station, and will upgrade infrastructure in the area. The Redevelopment Agency also must relocate a cell tower and utility lines, and install a traffic signal at the property’s parking lot entrance.

To make the property useable again, the Redevelopment Agency had to create a single lot out of the three separate, unusable parcels. Another necessity is to relocate underground utility lines, which had been put in without consideration for future development. And, so that passenger vehicles may access these restaurants in a safe way, a traffic signal must be installed for this project.

“Because of these challenges, this project faced greater expense than normally would be required of a retail project,” Vargas said. “This project must bear the entire cost for public improvements that would normally be borne by a much larger geographic area.”

“Just because this location needed a lot of financial help, doesn’t mean we won’t help other businesses as well,” Steel noted. “For as long as we have a Redevelopment Agency, Rialto will help small businesses who are already here upgrade, expand or relocate within the city, and we will bring new businesses in, which will increase our economic well-being.”

“We have already provided help to many small businesses, both in downtown Rialto and along Foothill Boulevard, which were seeking to acquire or rehabilitate commercial structures,” Steel added. “Two examples are Coffee Nutz and Johnson’s Hardware.”

In-N-Out Burger restaurant’s property transformation is one of several projects the Rialto Redevelopment Agency is currently funding. Others include:

§ $30 million to widen the Riverside Avenue interchange at Interstate 10. This project will reduce congestion and improve economic development opportunities at this intersection.

§ $15 million to extend Pepper Avenue to the 210 Freeway, opening up 175 acres for future economic development.

§ $5.8 million to replace the fire station that was at 1925 N. Rialto Ave. The new fire station will have modern features, allowing firefighters and paramedics to better serve Rialto residents.

§ $7 million to improve Fergusson Park, including creating two new football fields.

§ $2 million for construction of 75 units of senior housing on Foothill Boulevard at Cactus Avenue.

§ $1 million to expand the Rialto Library and add a new computer lab.

“The Rialto Redevelopment Agency has an aggressive program to reshape the community and help both businesses and residents,” Steel said.

For more information about how the Rialto Redevelopment Agency can help a business to upgrade, expand or relocate within the city, contact Robb Steel at (909) 879-1140 or (909) 879-1149.

About Rialto

Although the City of Rialto is located in the middle of one of the nation’s fastest growing regions, it has retained a small town atmosphere and similar quality of life. Rialto is an ethnically diverse and progressive community, which boasts several unique community assets including its own police and fire departments, a city-owned fitness center, performing arts theater, nine beautiful parks, a community center and senior center. Rialto is near mountains, beaches, deserts and other recreational areas.

Rialto’s housing mix and home costs are some of the most affordable in the southern California region. First-time homebuyers find Rialto more affordable than almost any other comparable community in the region. Executives and those seeking high-end homes also find they can purchase much more home for their money in Rialto. This lower cost translates into more discretionary income for residents, thus benefiting retailers and service providers.

For more information about Rialto, go to www.ci.rialto.ca <http://www.ci.rialto.ca> or call (909) 820-2525.

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Media:  If you would like any of the photos in the slide show below please send an email to Chris@DameronCommunications.com with the photo id number and I will have it to you within 24 hours.  If you require the photo sooner please call Chris Sloan at (909) 888-0017.

10.18.2010 Rialto Comments Off on Green Cars Travel California Stop in Rialto

Green Cars Travel California Stop in Rialto

Two RenDiesel-powered Audi A3’s will tour California Oct. 18-20 to promote the use alternative fuels, stopping in Rialto . Rentech, the manufacturer of RenDiesel, plans to build a manufacturing plant in Rialto.

(RIALTO, Calif.)  Two Audi A3 TDI cars, named “2010 Green Car of the Year” will make a stop at Rialto Civic Center, 150 S. Palm Ave., at 1 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 20 as they wind down a three-day journey from Eureka to San Diego.

Rialto is one of three stops on the journey, which its organizers are calling the Green Car Tour. After leaving Eureka the morning of Oct. 18, the cars will also visit Sacramento that day and San Francisco on Oct. 19, before heading to Rialto and their final tour destination, San Diego, on the last day of the trip.

Rialto’s stop celebrates the city’s future with Rentech which, as one of the Green Car Tour organizers, is supplying the RenDiesel® fuel that will power these Audi A3 TDI cars on their cross-state journey.

When I drove to Amsterdam, I took out temporary European car insurance for the weekend, didn’t cost too much IIRC.

“Rialto will be the only stop in the six-county Southern California Association of Governments region,” said Rialto City Council Member Deborah Robertson, who will emcee a ceremony welcoming the Audi A3 TDI cars and the tour participants to Rialto.

“The organizers could have chosen to drive straight down Interstate 5 from San Francisco to San Diego, but because Rentech is manufacturing this high-quality alternative fuel in Rialto, the Green Car Tour is coming here.” Robertson said.

The Rialto Renewable Energy Center is a plant where it will manufacture RenDiesel® and other synthetic fuels from urban green waste, such as yard clippings.

“The Rialto Renewable Energy Center will create more than 1,000 jobs, which will significantly stimulate the local and state economies. In addition, it will provide renewable fuels and power, reducing greenhouse gas emissions to clean the air, said Rentech President and Chief Executive Officer D. Hunt Ramsbottom.

“San Bernardino County provides great economic opportunity and Rialto is an ideal home for our renewable fuels and power manufacturing center,” Ramsbottom continued.

“We would like the opportunity to recognize the efforts of Rialto, San Bernardino County, and the South Coast Air Quality Management District to create healthy, sustainable communities and encourage economic investment as well as the success of California’s environmental policies.”

Rialto wants to see many businesses like Rentech come to its city, Robertson said.

“We see Rialto as an ideal location for businesses advancing in green technology applications,” she said. “We recognize the economic benefits they bring to our city and the environmental benefits they bring to our region.”

Other Green Car Tour organizers are Audi and the Green Car Journal, a magazine devoted to informing readers about cars that are better for the environment than most because of better fuel efficiency and less pollution. The official tour sponsor is Robert Bosch LLC, a manufacturer of injectors, fuel pumps and engine controls that help diesel-powered cars achieve high fuel efficiency and low emissions.

The Audi A3 TDI, which can run on RenDiesel® or regular diesel, gets 42 miles per gallon.

After completing the tour in San Diego, the cars will head north on Oct. 21 to the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, where an A3 TDI will be added to its alternate power exhibit. Green Car Journal will then announce the nominees for 2011 Green Car of the Year, which will be named in Los Angeles on Nov. 18.

At each stop on the tour, representatives of Audi, Rentech, and the Green Car Journal will meet with elected officials or their staff, members of the media, and business and community leaders.

 

About Rialto

Although the City of Rialto is located in the middle of one of the nation’s fastest growing regions, it has retained a small town atmosphere and similar quality of life. Rialto is an ethnically diverse and progressive community, which boasts several unique community assets including its own police and fire departments, a city-owned fitness center, performing arts theater, nine beautiful parks, a community center and senior center. Rialto is near mountains, beaches, deserts and other recreational areas.

Rialto’s housing mix and home costs are some of the most affordable in the southern California region. First-time homebuyers find Rialto more affordable than almost any other comparable community in the region especially with the Freight to Canada areas. Executives and those seeking high-end homes also find they can purchase much more home for their money in Rialto. This lower cost translates into more discretionary income for residents, thus benefiting retailers and service providers.

For more information and for coupons at a1garagedoorrepairmilwaukee.com Rialto, go to www.ci.Rialto.ca.us or call (909) 820-2525.

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10.18.2010 Rialto Comments Off on Rialto Program Saves Money on Prescriptions

Rialto Program Saves Money on Prescriptions

Rialto Council Member Deborah Robertson encourages other residents of the city to receive a free card entitling them to discounts at most of the city's pharmacies.

(RIALTO, Calif.)  Rialto residents are discovering a way to save an average of 20 cents on the dollar for prescription drugs purchased at CVS and other local pharmacies.

Anyone who lives in Rialto can simply pick up a Prescription Discount Card at any of Rialto’s participating pharmacies. The cards can also be printed from www.rialtoca.gov .

The resulting savings vary depending on pharmacy and prescription, but can be significant.

“I personally have used the Prescription Discount Card for a prescription to help someone in my family,” said Rialto City Council Member Deborah Robertson.  “The savings on that particular prescription were almost half.”

“Many of our clients need all the help they can get when purchasing prescriptions,” said Alton Quan, pharmacist at the 550 S. Riverside Ave. Wal-Greens. “The Pharmacy Discount Program offers them that help.”

Only one card is needed per family, which can use the card an unlimited number of times. There are no age or income requirements, and no enrollment or membership fees.

Robertson noted that sometimes, prescriptions help people prevent onset of a serious health problem. This card is part of a program the city has called “Healthy Rialto,” which is committed to giving city residents the tools they need to stay healthy.

“Prevention is so important to having a healthy city,” Robertson said. “We want to prevent illness from happening, and we want everyone to have affordable medications so they can get or stay healthy.”

Rialto offers this card through a program of the National League of Cities, which the league created with help from CVS Pharmacy. It is for families and individuals who do not have insurance providing prescription drug coverage.

Participating Rialto pharmacies include:

  • CVS Pharmacy, 211 W. Baseline Road, (909) 874-8002
  • Walgreen’s, 1280 W. Foothill (909) 879-0305, 118 E. Baseline Road, (909) 562-0267 or 550 S. Riverside Ave., (909) 874-6700.
  • Wal-Mart Pharmacy, 1610 S. Riverside Ave., (909) 875-2131
  • Rialto Vista Pharmacy, 436 S. Riverside Ave. (909) 875-7620
  • Rite-Aid Pharmacy, 585 S. Riverside (909) 820-7474 or 2020 N. Riverside Ave. (909) 873-2835
  • ABC Pharmacy, 826 E. Foothill Blvd. (909) 546-1000
  • Foothill Pharmacy, 1850 N. Riverside Ste. 170, (909) 874-2385
  • North Rialto Drug, 531 E. Foothill Blvd. (909) 875-2131

Additionally, the cards are available at the city’s Human Resources Office, 290 W. Rialto Ave.; its Utility Billing Office, 150 S. Palm Ave. and its Senior Center, 1411 S. Riverside Ave.

Residents may also call Rialto’s Human Resources Department at (909) 820-2540 and ask for Betty for more information, or call 1-888-620-1749.

Although the City of Rialto is located in the middle of one of the nation’s fastest growing regions, it has retained a small town atmosphere and similar quality of life. Rialto is an ethnically diverse and progressive community, which boasts several unique community assets including its own police and fire departments, a city-owned racquet and fitness center, performing arts theater, a community center and senior center. Rialto is near mountains, beaches, deserts and other recreational areas.

Rialto’s housing mix and home costs are some of the most affordable in the southern California region. First-time homebuyers find Rialto more affordable than almost any other comparable community in the region. Executives and those seeking high-end homes also find they can purchase much more home for their money in Rialto. This lower cost of living in Rialto also translates into more discretionary income for residents, thus benefiting retailers and service providers.

For more information about Rialto, go to www.ci.rialto.ca.us or call (909) 820-2525.

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10.05.2010 Rialto Comments Off on Fergusson Park in Rialto gets $6 million upgrade

Fergusson Park in Rialto gets $6 million upgrade

A master plan adopted by the City of Rialto shows the new amenities coming to Fergusson Park over the next 12 months.

Hank and Olga Vasquez walk their dogs along a walking path in Fergusson Park in Rialto. Visible to the right of the Vasquezes is a portion of the 10 acres that will be transformed into other recreational amenities over the coming year. Photo by Chris Sloan

(RIALTO, Calif.) A $6 million upgrade, including two new football fields, begins at Alec Fergusson Park on Oct. 11.

The city of Rialto intends to complete this upgrade in October 2011. Fergusson Park is at 2395 W. Sunrise, near West Casa Grande Avenue and North Alder Street.

“We will be more than doubling the usable area of Fergusson Park,” said Recreation and Community Services Director Larry Thornburg. Eight acres of this 18-acre park were previously developed. This project develops the remaining 10 acres.”

Besides the football fields, new amenities for Fergusson Park include a skateboard area, playground, picnic areas, additional parking lot, an additional basketball court, and a snack bar/restroom building.

Rialto contractor Robert Clapper Construction submitted the successful bid for this project.

“We at R.C. Construction are very excited at the opportunity to provide construction services for our ‘home town’ here in the City of Rialto,” said Company President Robert Clapper.  “Our corporate headquarters are located less then a mile from the park so that gives us a great chance to pay special attention to the project. We hope residents will enjoy this park for years to come.”

Funds for this park are from a $6.3 million community improvement bond the Rialto Redevelopment Agency obtained in 2008.

Fergusson Park is one of nine city parks in Rialto. Besides the new amenities the developed eight acres of the park include an existing basketball court, a quarter-mile walking track, a picnic area, two tennis courts, horseshoe pits, a tot playground, and a softball field. The new restroom building will add to one serving the eight acres already developed.

The other Rialto City Parks are:

Andreson Park features a playground, walking track, three large picnic shelters and a basketball court.

Andreson Park, 726 S. Lilac: Features here include a quarter-mile walking track, a basketball court, playground equipment for small children and three large picnic shelters.

Bud Bender Park features Little League and Pony League baseball fields, a T-Ball field and picnic areas. Photo by Chris Sloan

Youth baseball lovers of all ages will enjoy the amenities at Bud Bender Park in Rialto. Photo by Chris Sloan

Bud Bender Park, 300 N. Lilac Ave., which has Little League and Pony League baseball fields, and a T-Ball field. It also has a picnic area.

Birdsall Park in Rialto features Little League and T-ball fields, picnic areas and a children’s playground. Photo by Chris Sloan

Baseball and basketball are available at Birdsall Park in Rialto. Photo by Chris Sloan

Roger Birdsall Park, 2611 N. Linden Ave., has two Little League ball fields and one for T-Ball. It also offers a picnic area and a children’s playground.

A children’s playground and a picnic shelter are among the amenities of Jerry Eaves Park in Rialto. Photo by Chris Sloan

Jerry Eaves park in Rialto is also a great place to play soccer. Photo by Chris Sloan

Jerry Eaves Park, 1485 N. Ayala Ave., has 15 soccer fields, three large picnic shelters and several smaller picnic areas, and a children’s playground.

Flores Park includes a children’s playground, picnic area and walking track. Photo by Chris Sloan

Flores Park, 1020 W. Etiwanda Ave., has a picnic area, children’s playground and a quarter-mile walking track.

Frisbie Park includes three Little League and two girls’ softball fields, as well as picnic areas, playground equipment and basketball courts.

Frisbie Park, 19901 N. Acacia Ave., has three Little League fields and three girl’s softball fields, picnic areas, playground equipment and basketball courts.

Margaret Todd Park is the place for skateboarders in Rialto, but they will have another place to skate when the expansion of Fergusson Park is complete in October 2011. Photo by Chris Sloan

Margaret Todd Park includes a skate park for skateboarders and roller skaters, picnic areas and open space. Photo by Chris Sloan

Margaret Todd Park, 201 N. Willow St., has a skate park for skateboarding and roller-skating, picnic areas and open space.

Rialto City Park is the place for football, but an expansion of Fergusson Park will give the city’s youth football players more places to play. Photo by Chris Sloan

Rialto City Park includes baseball fields, a football field, picnic areas and playground equipment.

Rialto City Park, 130 E. San Bernardino Ave., has one football field, one Pony League field and one Little League field. It also has picnic areas, playground equipment and an outdoor stage.

Although the City of Rialto is located in the middle of one of the nation’s fastest growing regions, it has retained a small town atmosphere and similar quality of life. Rialto is an ethnically diverse and progressive community, which boasts several unique community assets including its own police and fire departments, a city-owned racquet and fitness center, performing arts theater, a community center and senior center. Rialto is near mountains, beaches, deserts and other recreational areas.

Rialto’s housing mix and home costs are some of the most affordable in the southern California region. First-time homebuyers find Rialto more affordable than almost any other comparable community in the region. Executives and those seeking high-end homes also find they can purchase much more home for their money in Rialto. This lower cost of living in Rialto also translates into more discretionary income for residents, thus benefiting retailers and service providers.

For more information about Rialto, go to www.ci.rialto.ca.us or call (909) 820-2525.

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10.01.2010 Rialto Comments Off on Route 66 Sporting New Pavement In Rialto

Route 66 Sporting New Pavement In Rialto

Foothill Boulevard in Rialto is torn up no more! The city has completed replacement of the pavement along the entire length of Foothill Boulevard through Rialto, which is also a portion of the historic Route 66. Photo by Chris Sloan

All American Asphalt workers put the finishing touches on the newly repaved Foothill Boulevard in Rialto, which is also a portion of the historic Route 66. Photo by Carl Dameron

(left to right) All American Asphalt crew Mike Jones, Francisco Carranza (riding on back of the asphalt paver) driver Martin Barba and Florentino Alvarez (pushing excess asphalt) worked in heat to put new asphalt pavement on Foothill Boulevard (historic Route 66) in Rialto. Photo by Chris Sloan

New taller and wider bus shelters offering even more shade have been installed on Riverside Drive in Rialto, and will soon be installed on Foothill Boulevard. In addition to the shelter itself, the bus stops on both streets have new park benches and trash containers. Photo by Chris Sloan

An Omnitrans bus parks on one of the new concrete bus pads on Foothill Boulevard in Rialto. Photo by Carl Dameron

Route 66 is looking new again, now that the City of Rialto has taken over maintenance of the two-mile stretch running through its municipal boundaries.

At the end of October, Rialto will finish a three-month project to repair pavement along the entire stretch of Route 66 within its city limits, which runs along Foothill Boulevard from Maple Avenue to Pepper Avenue. The city awarded a $3.465 million contract to All-American Asphalt of Corona, which began construction July 26.

The project also involves installing bus pads (a rectangular area of concrete, on the street for buses to stop) adding some sidewalks, curbs and gutters and repairing storm drains.

“This is one of our city’s highest priorities,” said City Engineer Ahmad Ansari. “Route 66 runs throughout our city, and we want people to see that Rialto is a nice place to live and do business.”

The City of Rialto entered into a second phase of its Foothill Paving Project on Tuesday, Sept. 28 when the City Council awarded to Ian Davidson Landscape Architecture of Riverside a $62,620 contract for design of entry monuments that will be placed near Route 66 at the east and west city limits. The design will include landscaped areas of 100 to 200 feet around each monument.

Phase Two will also include four new bus shelters along Foothill Boulevard between Sycamore and Willow avenues, improving the intersection of Riverside Drive and Foothill Boulevard and new street name signs for Foothill Boulevard throughout its course in Rialto.

Foothill Boulevard has a long history dating back to the early 20th century when it was part of the legendary U.S. Route 66 that connected Rialto and many other then-small towns between Los Angeles and Chicago.

Later, the Foothill Boulevard portion of Route 66 was officially known as California Highway 66, and maintained by the California Department of Transportation. It was known then as an “urban highway,” that is a major street serving a city’s commercial area.

In 2008, CalTrans gave Rialto’s portion of Route 66 to the city, and paid the city $1.85 million to take care of past due street maintenance. Part of this $1.85 million is being used for the paving project, while the rest will be used for future needs.

“Urban highways require a lot of maintenance, so the state is working with California cities to give them local control of these important roads,” said Ansari. “Before it turns a highway over, CalTrans evaluates the roads maintenance needs, and negotiates a payment that is agreeable to CalTrans and the city.”

This is part of $8 million Rialto plans in street improvements during the Fiscal Year 2010-2011, which is July 1, 2010 through July 1, 2011. Rialto’s general fund partially pays for these projects, along with county, state and federal funds that must be spent on street improvements.

Other projects include:

  • Pavement overlays on four to four and one-half miles of city streets, especially Linden Avenue north of Foothill Boulevard and two sections of Baseline Avenue, one extending from Riverside Avenue to the eastern city limits and one from Cedar Avenue to the western city limits.
  • Repairing cracks and installing protective slurry seal coating on about one-fifth of the city’s streets.
  • Designing West Coast Boulevard, a new street scheduled to be constructed in north Rialto during the 2011-2012 fiscal year.
  • Design phase of a widening project for Ayala Ave., also scheduled to be constructed in 2011-2012.
  • Widening of Cedar Avenue in several locations between Etiwanda Avenue and Foothill Avenue.

Although the City of Rialto is located in the middle of one of the nation’s fastest growing regions, it has retained a small town atmosphere and similar quality of life. Rialto is an ethnically diverse and progressive community, which boasts several unique community assets including its own police and fire departments, a city-owned racquet and fitness center, performing arts theater, a community center and senior center. Rialto is near mountains, beaches, deserts and other recreational areas.

Rialto’s housing mix and home costs are some of the most affordable in the southern California region. First-time homebuyers find Rialto more affordable than almost any other comparable community in the region. Executives and those seeking high-end homes also find they can purchase much more home for their money in Rialto. This lower cost of living in Rialto also translates into more discretionary income for residents, thus benefiting retailers and service providers.

For more information about Rialto, go to www.ci.rialto.ca.us or call (909) 820-2525.

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Media: If you would like any of the photos in the slide show below please send an email to Chris@DameronCommunications.com with the photo id number and i will have it to you within 24 hours. If you require the photo sooner please call Chris Sloan at (909) 888-0017.

09.16.2010 Rialto Comments Off on Rialto Stepping Into Economic Success

Rialto Stepping Into Economic Success

Rialto Renaissance, scheduled to open in 2013, will convert the Rialto Municipal Airport into a multiple use business center. It’s one of the largest economic development projects the Rialto Redevelopment Agency has planned to stimulate the city’s economy.

(RIALTO, Calif.) As the nation and the Inland Empire step out of one of the worst recessions in more than 70 years, the City of Rialto is poised to take advantage of this with several large projects designed to bring jobs and revenue to the city.

“We are attracting new businesses and green industries to Rialto already,” said Robb Steel, director of the Redevelopment Agency of the City of Rialto. “Once the economy recovers more fully we will be able to accomplish even more.”

Two of the major focuses of Rialto’s redevelopment plans are to attract new “ green” industries, which promote the use of new environmentally friendly technologies; and Rialto Renaissance, which is converting the city’s underused municipal airport into a mixture of commercial, industrial and residential uses.

Even in difficult economic times, Rialto has received national attention for bringing in two new companies, both representative of the types of “green” industries Rialto city leaders hope will someday be a key part of the city’s economy.

“They are models of the types of industries we’re looking for,” Steel said.

Enertech, which opened a plant in Rialto in March 2009, converts biosolids into fuel using a patented process known as SlurryCarb. This process removes more water, produces twice as much solid matter (fuel pellets) and uses 60 percent less energy than conventional ways of converting biosolids into fuel.

The company is obtaining its biosolids from the sanitation departments of Rialto and Riverside, the San Bernardino Municipal Water District, and sanitation districts serving Orange and Los Angeles counties. After converting them into fuel pellets, it is supplying clean-burning energy to fire the kilns of local cement companies.

Rentech makes synthetic fuel such as synthetic diesel and synthetic gasoline, primarily from yard waste such as pruned tree branches .  It has a contract to deliver synthetic aviation fuel to the Los Angeles World Airports, including Ontario International (ONT) and Los Angeles International (LAX.)

This fuel meets California’s stringent clean air standards, and can also be used in other states.

The other major project, Renaissance Rialto, takes advantage of the airport’s proximity to two off-ramps of the 210 Freeway, and is expected to bring in businesses that can hire many of the city’s residents.

“We want to bring jobs that match all of our residents skill sets,” Steel said. “Some of our residents are highly educated, others have learned specific trades, and others might be seeking an entry-level job to help finance their further education.”

The Redevelopment Agency is now working with a developer to get through the City of Rialto’s approval process for large projects, and is also waiting for greater economic recovery. Once it can break ground, the developer will have to begin by installing infrastructure, such as roads and sewers.

Steel expects the first new businesses developed through Renaissance Rialto to open in 2013 if the economic recovery is as strong as expected by then. They will, in the first few years, operate alongside the airport, but within a few years, the city will convert the airport itself to other uses.

“It is a Herculean effort to convert a municipal airport to a multiple-use development on the scale of Renaissance Rialto,” Steel said. “But it has good prospects, whereas the property is expensive to maintain as an airport. and the City Council of Rialto believes this is a better direction.”

Rialto is a city of approximately 100,000 ethnically diverse residents, but still maintains a small-town, family-friendly atmosphere. It provides affordable opportunities for new businesses and new residents.

For more information about Rialto, go to  www.ci.rialto.ca.us or call (909) 820-2525.

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01.27.2010 Rialto Comments Off on Deborah Robertson Helps Rialto Get Discount Prescriptions

Deborah Robertson Helps Rialto Get Discount Prescriptions

Riverside Mayor and National League of Cities Chairman Ron Loveridge and Rialto Council Member Deborah Robertson, with samples of the  prescription discount cards available to residents of both their cities and several others in southern California. The cities offer the discounts through a program of the National League of Cities. Photo by Carl Dameron

(RIALTO, Calif.) The City of Rialto is offering its residents a free card that provides savings of up to 20 percent on prescription drugs purchased at CVS and other major pharmacies.

“One card serves an entire family,” said Council Member Deborah Robertson. “They will save up to 20 percent on any medications any family member needs, some of which cost as much as $2000 a month.”

Robertson noted that sometimes, prescriptions help people prevent onset of a serious health problem. This card is part of a program the city has called “Healthy Rialto,” which is committed to giving city residents the tools they need to stay healthy.

“Prevention is so important to having a healthy city,” Robertson said. “It’s more than treating illness in the hospital; it’s also working to prevent illness from happening.”

Rialto offers this card through a program of the National League of Cities, which the league created with help from CVS Pharmacy. It is for families and individuals who do not have insurance providing prescription drug coverage.

In Rialto, the card is available at the Rialto Civic Center, 150 S. Palm Ave., and the Rialto Chamber of Commerce, 120 N. Riverside Ave.

Rialto residents may also call Rialto’s Human Resources Department at (909) 820-2540 and ask for Betty for more information.

Another Inland Empire city offering the program is Riverside, whose Mayor Ron Loveridge serves as the current chairman of the National League of Cities. Robertson worked with him to bring the program to Rialto.

“I really compliment Deborah Robertson for seeing and seizing this opportunity to serve the citizens of Rialto,” Loveridge said.

In Rialto, the card is accepted at CVS, Walgreen’s, Wal-Mart, Rite-Aid, Foothill Pharmacy, Rialto Vista Pharmacy, ABC Pharmacy and North Rialto Drugs.

Besides Riverside and Rialto, the National League of Cities website identifies other Inland Empire cities offering the program as Cathedral City and Murrieta in Riverside County and Fontana and Grand Terrace in San Bernardino County.

In Los Angeles County, it identifies the cities of Baldwin Park, Bellflower, Claremont, Culver City, Duarte, Lynwood, Rosemead, South El Monte and West Hollywood as offering the program.

Residents of these cities should contact their City Hall for more information.
“Prescription drugs cost a lot of money,” Robertson said. “If a family spends $100 on prescription drugs then they could save $20. That could be spent on the electric bill, gas bill or other bills.”

“Across the country cities that have been involved with this program have seen the savings and they are very appreciative,” Mayor Loveridge said.
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