Moreno Valley Unified School District

02.28.2014 Moreno Valley Unified School District Comments Off on Superintendent Brings Success to Moreno Valley Schools

Superintendent Brings Success to Moreno Valley Schools

Dr. Judy White, superintendent of the Moreno Valley Unified School District

Dr. Judy White, superintendent of the Moreno Valley Unified School District

Published On : 2/26/2014 7:30 AM
By : Ken Vincent
From : KVCR

Categories : A few years ago, the Moreno Valley schools were in trouble. However, under the leadership of Superintendent Dr. Judy White, the Moreno Valley Unified School District has dramatically turned around, and now has received applause from state education officials, the state teachers’ union, local businesses, and parents of kids who attend Moreno Valley schools. KVCR’s Ken Vincent has a conversation with Superintendent White about how she and the community have pulled together the elements of success in the Moreno Valley School District.

Listen to Podcast
http://kvcr.org/News/Stories/2014/February/0226_Superintendent_Brings_Success_to_Moreno_Valley_Schools

02.10.2014 Moreno Valley Unified School District Comments Off on Moreno Valley School District and Teachers Union Working Together For Student Success

Moreno Valley School District and Teachers Union Working Together For Student Success

Dr. Judy White, superintendent of the Moreno Valley unified School District

Dr. Judy White, superintendent of the Moreno Valley unified School District

 

“We meet regularly to work together on the issues facing our school district,” said Harold Acord, president of the Moreno Valley Educators’ Association. “This is true whether it’s a problem affecting the entire school district, or one individual teacher’s problem.”

 

(Moreno Valley, CA)  In Moreno Valley both the district administration and the teachers’ union have a common goal. They work together to achieve the district’s mission of preparing students to become productive members of society.

 

“We agree on our mission of learning for all,” said Dr. Judy White, superintendent of Moreno Valley Unified School District.  “We collaborate on best practices that increase student achievement.”

 

“We meet regularly to work together on the issues facing our school district,” said Harold Acord, president of the Moreno Valley Educators’ Association. “This is true whether it’s a problem affecting the entire school district, or one individual teacher’s problem.”

 

“We provide support and communication to each one of our teachers, so they know how much they are valued in our school district,” Dr. White said.

 

An issue affecting the entire district is initiatives the state of California is considering regarding school funding.  The 2013-2014 state budget significantly changes how public schools are funded, giving most school districts more money to spend as they see fit, and less restricted to specific purposes.

 

“We meet regularly to work together on the issues facing our school district,” said Harold Acord, president of the Moreno Valley Educators’ Association. “This is true whether it’s a problem affecting the entire school district, or one individual teacher’s problem.”

“We meet regularly to work together on the issues facing our school district,” said Harold Acord, president of the Moreno Valley Educators’ Association. “This is true whether it’s a problem affecting the entire school district, or one individual teacher’s problem.”

However, school districts must now provide more accountability to the state for how they’re educating students.  The standards for this accountability haven’t yet been set, so school districts statewide are weighing in on what they think will work.

 

“In Moreno Valley, the district administration and its teachers stand shoulder to shoulder on state initiatives related to funding,” Dr. White said. “We are also exploring other ways to focus on students’ and teachers’ learning conditions, so we can make sure the state provides funding mechanisms that meet the needs of our students.”

School districts also receive federal funding. This also, more than ever, is tied to academic performance.

 

“Some federal grants require teacher evaluations before the funding is allowed,” Dr. White said. “This is based on the assumption that when teachers are evaluated on their performance, student achievement improves.”

 

“The Moreno Valley Educator’s Association and Moreno Valley Unified School District administrators have collaborated on an evaluation instrument that includes student achievement as one of its indicators. However this is expressed in a format that structures collaborative conversations, support and high expectations between the site administrator and teachers. This was done because it is the right thing to do not because it was a requirement of a grant,” said Dr. White.

 

Besides working together to develop accountability standards and positions on state and federal legislation, the Moreno Valley Educators’ Association and the district administration also collaborate on other projects. Recently, one of these was planning and hosting a regional leadership conference for teachers and administrators, which they had titled “Collaborate, Coach and Connect.”

“We had several speakers from the California Teachers Association, and the keynote speaker was CTA President Dean Vogel,” said local president Acord. “It was a great success, and we received high evaluations from those who participated.”

Since students are the top priority in Moreno Valley Unified School District, recognizing outstanding student achievement is another way the administration and teachers’ union work together. With a third partner, the Moreno Valley Chamber of Commerce, they provide a “Student of the Month” program to honor and reward one outstanding student each month at each school in the district.  They also work jointly with the Chamber to explain how local businesses can support education in Moreno Valley.

 

Even in contract negotiations, the one activity where relationships between school administrations and their teachers unions can be adversarial, they’re not in Moreno Valley Unified School District. Here, the two sides participate in Interest Based Bargaining.

 

In typical negotiations, the teachers’ union asks for as generous a contract as it finds feasible, while the district administration counter offers with something less generous. The contract is successfully negotiated when one or both sides make concessions to the other.

 

But in Interest Based Bargaining, the administration and teachers focus on common goals, and work together to ensure these goals are met. Since attracting and keeping quality teachers is one of their common goals, developing an attractive teachers’ contract becomes a solution.

 

“It is supposed to be a win-win situation,” Acord said. “It’s not one side wins and the other side loses.”

 

Clearly, with everyone working together, there is one big winner in the process. That is Moreno Valley Unified School District students.

 

The Moreno Valley Unified School District’s mission is to prepare all students academically and socially to become productive members of society.

 

For more information on the Moreno Valley Unified School District’s call the District office at (951) 571-7500 or go to their website at www.MVUSD.net.

 

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12.11.2013 Moreno Valley Unified School District Comments Off on Moreno Valley School District and Teachers Union Working Together For Student Success

Moreno Valley School District and Teachers Union Working Together For Student Success

 

 

Dr. Judy D. White flanked by band members at the State of the District Speech

Dr. Judy D. White flanked by band members at the State of the District Speech

 

“We meet regularly to work together on the issues facing our school district,” said Harold Acord, president of the Moreno Valley Educators’ Association. “This is true whether it’s a problem affecting the entire school district, or one individual teacher’s problem.”

 

(Moreno Valley, CA)  In Moreno Valley both the district administration and the teachers’ union have a common goal. They work together to achieve the district’s mission of preparing students to become productive members of society.

 

“We agree on our mission of learning for all,” said Dr. Judy White, superintendent of Moreno Valley Unified School District.  “We collaborate on best practices that increase student achievement.”

 

“We meet regularly to work together on the issues facing our school district,” said Harold Acord, president of the Moreno Valley Educators Association. “This is true whether it’s a problem affecting the entire school district, or one individual teacher’s problem.”

 

 “We provide support and communication to each one of our teachers, so they know how much they are valued in our school district,” Dr. White said.

 

An issue affecting the entire district is initiatives the state of California is considering regarding school funding.  The 2013-2014 state budget significantly changes how public schools are funded, giving most school districts more money to spend flexibly on student programs  

 

However, school districts must now provide more accountability to the state for how they are educating students.  The standards for this accountability haven’t yet been set, so school districts statewide are weighing in on what they think will work.

 

“In Moreno Valley, the district administration and its teachers stand shoulder to shoulder on state initiatives related to funding,” Dr. White said. “We are also exploring other ways to focus on students’ and teachers’ learning conditions, so we can make sure the state provides funding mechanisms that meet the needs of our students.”

 

School districts also receive federal funding. This, more than ever, is tied to academic performance.

 

In Moreno Valley, the teachers’ union and the District have stepped up to develop a student-centered evaluation pilot program rather than waiting for grant opportunities which may come with mandates.

 

“Together, teachers and administrators have collaborated on an evaluation instrument that includes the California Standards for the Teaching Profession as a rubric of measurement. This is expressed in a format that structures collaborative conversations, support and high expectations between the site administrator and teachers. This was done because it is the right thing to do,” said Dr. White.

 

Besides working together to develop accountability standards and positions on state and federal legislation, the Moreno Valley Educators’ Association and the district administration also collaborate on other projects. Recently, one of these was planning and hosting a regional leadership conference and access to for teachers and administrators, which had was titled “Collaborate, Coach and Connect.”

 

Moreno Valley Unified School District superintendent of schools Dr. Judy White and California CTA state president Dean Vogel at 2013 joint leadership summit.  Vogel spoke well of the direction the district is taking to increase student performance.

Moreno Valley Unified School District superintendent of schools Dr. Judy White and California CTA state president Dean Vogel at 2013 Joint Leadership Summit.
Vogel spoke well of the direction the district is taking to increase student performance.

“We had several speakers from the California Teachers Association, and the keynote speaker was CTA President Dean Vogel,” said local president Acord. “It was a great success, and we received high evaluations from those who participated.”

 

Since students are the top priority in Moreno Valley Unified School District, recognizing outstanding student achievement is another way the administration and teachers’ union work together. With a third partner, the Moreno Valley Chamber of Commerce, they provide a “Student of the Month” program to honor and reward one outstanding student each month at each school in the district.  They also work jointly with the Chamber to explain how local businesses can support education in Moreno Valley.

 

Even in contract negotiations, the one activity where relationships between school administrations and their teachers unions can be adversarial, they’re not in Moreno Valley Unified School District. Here, the two parties participate in Interest Based Bargaining.

 

In typical negotiations, the teachers’ union asks for as generous a contract as it finds feasible, while the district administration counter offers with something less generous. The contract is successfully negotiated when one or both sides make concessions to the other.

 

But in Interest Based Bargaining, the administration and teachers focus on common interests, and work together to ensure these interests are met. Since attracting and keeping quality teachers is one of their common goals, developing an attractive teachers’ contract becomes a solution.

 

“We meet regularly to work together on the issues facing our school district,” said Harold Acord, president of the Moreno Valley Educators’ Association. “This is true whether it’s a problem affecting the entire school district, or one individual teacher’s problem.”

“We meet regularly to work together on the issues facing our school district,” said Harold Acord, president of the Moreno Valley Educators’ Association. “This is true whether it’s a problem affecting the entire school district, or one individual teacher’s problem.”

 

“It is supposed to be a win-win situation,” Acord said. “It’s not one side wins, and the other side loses.”

 

Clearly, with everyone working together, there is one big winner in the process. That is Moreno Valley Unified School District students.

 

The Moreno Valley Unified School District’s mission is to prepare all students academically and socially to become productive members of society.

 

For more information on the Moreno Valley Unified School District call the district office at (951) 571-7500 or go to their website at www.MVUSD.net.

 

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12.04.2013 Moreno Valley Unified School District Comments Off on Canyon Springs High School Academy Is A Statewide Model

Canyon Springs High School Academy Is A Statewide Model

 
With its designation as a Lighthouse Academy, Canyon Springs High School has received a $10,000 stipend from the California Department of Education to help it carry out the responsibilities expected from Lighthouse Academies.   Front row-Ofelia Barriga, Elissa Fernandez, Ashley Harsma, Sierra Johnson, Marissa Alvarez, Jennifer Gill. Eric Prera.  Second Row- Janelle Blackwell, Mirna Serrano-Lara, Tara Wheatley, Amber Wilson, Molli Garcia, Xavier Clark.  Third Row – Devin Renwick, Alexis Torres, John Rivera-Sanchez, Rene Jimenez, Max Perez, Dakota Jacobs, Kelsey O’Connor.  Fourth Row- Jehzale Crockett, Priscilla Hernandez, Steven Forcina, Dominic Hernandez, Eric Maples, Alejandro Macias, Gabreil Arreddono.  Fifth Row – Mrs. Willene Biere

With its designation as a Lighthouse Academy, Canyon Springs High School has received a $10,000 stipend from the California Department of Education to help it carry out the responsibilities expected from Lighthouse Academies.Front row-Ofelia Barriga, Elissa Fernandez, Ashley Harsma, Sierra Johnson, Marissa Alvarez, Jennifer Gill. Eric Prera. Second Row- Janelle Blackwell, Mirna Serrano-Lara, Tara Wheatley, Amber Wilson, Molli Garcia, Xavier Clark. Third Row – Devin Renwick, Alexis Torres, John Rivera-Sanchez, Rene Jimenez, Max Perez, Dakota Jacobs, Kelsey O’Connor. Fourth Row- Jehzale Crockett, Priscilla Hernandez, Steven Forcina, Dominic Hernandez, Eric Maples, Alejandro Macias, Gabreil Arreddono. Fifth Row – Mrs. Willene Biere

 

 

 

(Moreno Valley, CA.) The Business Academy at Canyon Springs High School in Moreno Valley Unified School District has been selected as one of 15 Lighthouse Academy model programs in the State of California.

 

“It is so fitting that the Canyon Spring’s Business Academy would get the Lighthouse Academy award,” said Moreno Valley Unified School District Superintendent Dr. Judy White. “They have been a lighthouse of best business processes, competition and entrepreneurship.  The students are exceptional and have demonstrated the highest level of learning which is the application of that knowledge.

 

The Business Academy is one of three vocational academies at Canyon Springs High School. It also offers students a Health Careers Academy and a Creative Technologies Academy.

 

Vocational academies are a growing trend in educational reform. Moreno Valley Unified School District has been a part of this trend for almost 20 years, having created Canyon Springs High School’s Health Careers Academy in 1995. Besides those at Canyon Springs, MVUSD also offers Health Careers academies at Valley View and Vista del Lago high schools.

 

The California Department of Education created a program called California Partnership Academies to promote to school districts the idea of vocational academies, and assist them in creating programs of their own. Through an application process, California Partnership Academies selected the 15 Lighthouse Academy schools, including the Business Academy at Canyon Springs High School.

 

“We applied to become a Lighthouse Academy because we knew Canyon Springs High School has a program model that would benefit other school districts in California,” said Willene Biere, director of the Business Careers Academy for Canyon Springs High School, which is one of three vocational academies at the school. “This designation confirms the California Partnership Academies team wants to see more vocational academies like ours.”

 

Students in Canyon Springs High School’s academies receive mentoring and other support from the Moreno Valley business community, as well as from the educators within the program. In turn, these students support their younger classmates, Biere explained. Seniors help sophomores and juniors, and graduates of the academies often return to Canyon Springs High School to help those now attending.

 

With its designation as a Lighthouse Academy, Canyon Springs High School has received a $10,000 stipend from the California Department of Education to help it carry out the responsibilities expected from Lighthouse Academies.

 

Lighthouse Academies help the California Department of Education guide other high schools in an educational reform movement of offering instruction through academies, which are smaller groups of students within a school who are all interested in a specific type of career.  Canyon Springs High School began offering its students a choice of this type of instruction in 1995.

 

In academies, students take the same required academic courses as all others in their graduating class, but also must take a set of courses geared to their career plan. For instance, Business Academy students also take accounting as just one of the extra course requirements.

 

This differs from the traditional approach, where high school students choose from a smorgasbord of electives, and could have at least one course with any other student at their school. Whether a school has academies or not, a core of academic courses such as language arts, history and mathematics is required.

 

“Lighthouse Academies are important for several reasons,” said Jerry Winthrop, lead consultant for the California Partnership Academies program of the California Department of Education. This program oversees, at the state level, efforts many California school districts are making to create and maintain their own educational academies.

 

Lighthouse Academies work together and with a team from the California Department of Education to set standards for the entire vocational academies education program in California. This will start when representatives of all of the state’s Lighthouse Academies meet in Sacramento Dec. 2-4 to discuss projects they’ll work on together in 2014 and 2015.

 

Lighthouse Academies develop standards for all high schools offering this type of instruction, Wintrhop explained. They also help other schools begin or improve their vocational academies.

Moreno Valley Unified School District offers several other academies besides those at Canyon Springs High School.

 

Moreno Valley Unified School District offers more than 200 ROP and Career Technical Programs including those at Canyon Springs High School.

 

For more information about Career Technical programs in the Moreno Valley Unified School District please call (951) 571-7560.

 

For more information on the Moreno Valley Unified School District’s call the District office at (951) 571-7500 or go to the website at MVUSD.net.

 

About the Moreno Valley Unified School District

Moreno Valley Unified School District’s mission is to prepare all students academically and socially to become productive members of society.

 

Moreno Valley Unified School District has 3,400 employees and 35,000 students.

 

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MVUSD-PR-113.2 Canyon Springs Lighthouse
For more information call
Carl Dameron @ (909) 534-9500 

 

 

12.02.2013 Moreno Valley Unified School District Comments Off on Chamber Announces 2014 Citizen Of The Year Dr. Judy D. White

Chamber Announces 2014 Citizen Of The Year Dr. Judy D. White

 

Dr. Judy White, superintendent of the Moreno Valley unified School District

Dr. Judy White, superintendent of the Moreno Valley unified School District

(Moreno Valley, CA)  Dr. Judy D. White began her tenure as Superintendent for Moreno Valley Unified School District in February 2011, and immediately began connecting with the community, ultimately moving her family to our city. With over 35 years of experience in education she came in with a wealth of ideas, and has embedded her heart and soul to the students and families in this community.

 

She has procured several outside grants for literacy, volunteerism, and closing the achievement gap. She serves on the Board for National Center for Urban School Transformation (NCUST), Moreno Valley Cultural Arts Commission, ACCESS to the Future, and United Way of the Inland Valleys and serves on the UCR Citizen’s Advisory Committee for Teacher Education.

 

She was recently awarded the 2013 Woman of the Year for Moreno Valley by the 61st District Assemblyman, José Medina. Some of her other involvements include Optimists, Relay for Life, Music Changing Lives and Fighting for the Family Ministries. She developed a formal Adopt-a-School program to engage the business and faith communities into the school district to support the students.

 

Dr. White embraces a united effort of “Excellence on Purpose” and has become known as an inspirational advocate for all students. She has made a name for herself in the community for reaching out, embracing change for the better, and holding the district accountable for student success.

 

The Chamber would like to acknowledge all those who were nominated and thank them for their significant contribution to the growth and development of the City of Moreno Valley.

 

2014 Citizen of the Year Nominees

Alicia Berridge, James Baker,  Patricia Korzec, Ross Nakatani,  Tracy Smith, Richard Tegley, Ruth Van Hala, and Dr. Judy D. White

 

 

 

Carl M. Dameron, Creative Director

Dameron Communications

 

(909) 534-9500 cell

CarlD@DameronCommunications.com

www.DameronCommunications.com

 

11.21.2013 Moreno Valley Unified School District Comments Off on African-American Students RAP Their Way to Excellence In Moreno Valley Elementary Schools

African-American Students RAP Their Way to Excellence In Moreno Valley Elementary Schools

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Front row Students from

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Project Moving Forward, backed by a $1.9 million federal grant, improved academic scores in two local schools.  African American students at Hendrick Ranch Elementary School achieved impressive academic gains, where Academic Performance Index or API scores jumped 51 points

 

(Moreno Valley, CA)  Students in two Moreno Valley elementary schools have become top academic achievers through a simple concept: learning vocabulary the RAP way!

 

Short for Rehearse, Analyze and Produce, RAP is based on 12 years of research by Dr. Linda Ventriglia-Navarrette, a Harvard educated researcher and professor at National University.

 

Hendrick Ranch and Armada Elementary schools posted the highest academic scores in their history, becoming the top two achieving elementary schools in 2013 among 23 in the Moreno Valley Unified School District. Both schools are located in low-income neighborhoods where academic achievement has suffered.

 

African American students at Hendrick Ranch Elementary School achieved impressive academic gains, where Academic Performance Index or API scores jumped 51 points while improvement was up 49 points at Armada.  Hispanic students also made significant increases, moving from far below basic skills to proficiency in reading and math.

 

Based on the recent results, Hendrick Ranch was the only school in the District to achieve the state Academic Performance Index and Annual Yearly Progress scores.  Armada was the only school where over 90 percent socially disadvantaged students achieved an academic performance index of 700.  Hendrick Ranch achieved a 796 ranking.

 

How did they do it?  By adopting a vocabulary instructional program called RAP, or the Rule of three.  Armed with a $1.9 million federal grant funded by the U.S. Department of Education, the District created a partnership with National University where teachers learned how to increase student’s academic achievement through vocabulary instruction.

 

The program provided 60 hours of teacher training and coaching, using the Rule of 3 or RAP as ways to teach words across the curriculum.

 

Research shows that improving academic vocabulary has the highest correlation with success in school.

 

Other educators agree.  E.D. Hirsch, a widely known academic researcher, says, “The achievement gap between Black and White, rich and poor is not due to lack of money.  It largely comes down to a vocabulary gap, because words name things.”  Hirsch found that poor children have a massive vocabulary deficit that today’s U.S. education system does not address.

 

In the RAP program, students rehearse words by clicking out, spelling and saying the letters of the words, including focused conversations about the words.  They teach vocabulary words to a partner.  Students also analyze word structures and produce their own individual meanings for words in their Power Word books.

 

Many teachers at Hendrik and Armada elementary schools reported that the RAP program was popular with students.  They enjoyed learning new words, which became an exciting part of the school day.

 

Robert Gordon, who was principal of Hendrick Ranch said, “These vocabulary development strategies made a significant difference in students’ achievements.”

 

Armada principal Jeff Jones said, “Armada’s teachers improved the delivery of consistent, effective and engaging instructional strategies that addressed the critical areas of vocabulary development and reading comprehension.”

 

At the district, the performance results were well received.  “We are extremely proud of our students at Hendrick and Armada,” said Dr. Judy White, Superintendent of Schools in Moreno Valley.  “This program demonstrates how students in economically disadvantaged areas can achieve remarkable academic results by focusing on their learning styles.  It captures how students learn.”

 

For more information on the Moreno Valley Unified School District’s call the District office at (951) 571-7500 or go to the website at MVUSD.net.

 

 

About the Moreno Valley Unified School District

Moreno Valley Unified School District, with 3,400 employees and 35,000 students.

 

Moreno Valley Unified School District’s mission is to prepare all students academically and socially to become productive members of society.

 

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11.14.2013 Moreno Valley Unified School District Comments Off on You are cordially invited to attend

You are cordially invited to attend

You still have time to RSVP

 

You are cordially invited to attend

 State-of-School-District-in

The State of the School District Report for the

Moreno Valley Unified School District

 

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2013

VISTA DEL LAGO HIGH SCHOOL

15150 Lasselle Street, Moreno Valley, CA 92551

5:30 P.M. Reception (Hors d ’Oeuvres will be served)

6:00 P.M. Presentation

 

Please join us to learn about all the wonderful accomplishments of our

Students and the many ways the Moreno Valley Unified School District is accelerating achievement.

 

Please RSVP with Patty Diener at 951-571-7573 or email: pdiener@mvusd.net

 

 

 

11.11.2013 Moreno Valley Unified School District Comments Off on Moreno Valley Wins State Award for Excellence called the Golden Bell

Moreno Valley Wins State Award for Excellence called the Golden Bell

Canyon Springs Health Careers Academy  Sophomore students.

Canyon Springs Health Careers Academy Sophomore students. From the left to right: Top row: James Jones, Courtney Thomas, Jason Sanchez, Danny Calderon, Fernando Canales, Gerald Jocson, Jonathan Espinoza, Sabrina Garcia, Stephany Pita, Gizelle Suarez
Next row below: Teresa Becerra, Dalvir Kaur, Bobbie Sue Montanez, Jessica Sanchez, Lorena Mejia, Emily Guemez, Jessenia Sanchez, Belen Ochoa (she is kind of standing between the row and has glasses), Tuesday Martin
Next row below: Ashley Lopez, Rolando Mena, Brian Sanchez, Maria Gutierrez, Fernando Granados, Agienna Lewis, Brandon Garay, Adolfo Ventura, Anthony Ordinario
Front Row; Aileen Ayon, Paola Garcia, Breanna McFarland, Alexis Flores, Savannah Mercier-White, Melisa Franco, Jessica Rodriguez, Khalia Dade, Myra Peña

 

“The goal of the Health Careers Academy is to graduate students prepared for college and a career in the health care field, said Canyon Springs Health Careers Academy Director Sharon Scott. “Receiving the California Golden Bell award is confirmation that the team’s effort to ensure student achievement is both successful and effective.”

 

(Moreno Valley, CA)  the California School Boards Association recently recognized The Moreno Valley Unified School District as a winner of the prestigious Golden Bell Award for 2013. This award recognizes the academic success of Health Careers Academy on the campus of Canyon Springs High School.

 

“The selection of Canyon Springs Health Careers Academy as a Golden Bell Awards winner reflects the Moreno Valley Unified School District’s commitment to meeting the needs of students in careers that are needed and relevant,” said Dr. Judy D. White, district superintendent.

 

The CSBA recognized 59 public school’s programs in the state this year. It created the Golden Bell Awards program in 1980 to recognize innovative and successful programs that make a difference in students’ success, and focus on meeting the needs of all students.

 

Health Careers Academy is the oldest of several vocational academies Moreno Valley Unified School District has created. While students in these programs receive a well-rounded education, by following a recommended pathway of courses, they can either begin an entry-level career in their area of interest, or more easily transition to a college or university level education in the health career field after high school graduation.

 

“The goal of the Health Careers Academy is to graduate students prepared for college and a career in the health care field, said Academy Director Sharon Scott. “Receiving the California Golden Bell award is confirmation that the team’s effort to ensure student achievement is both successful and effective.”

 

Canyon Springs Health Careers Academy  students with the simulation Makiken “Annie” are Agienna Lewis and Anthony Ordinario

Canyon Springs Health Careers Academy students with the simulation Makiken “Annie” are Agienna Lewis and Anthony Ordinario

Students enter the Health Careers Academy as sophomores. In the academies, students have the same core requirements, such as English, social studies, and science as they would in a regular high school program, but take these courses from teachers at the academy.

 

Students also take vocational education courses through the academy.  In the introductory course, Introduction to Health Care, students learn medical technology, learn how to take vital signs, research health careers, develop resumes and are certified in first aid and CPR.

 

Juniors learn about cultural disparities in health care and biomedical ethics, and participate in mock interviews and job shadowing with the academy’s business partners.  In their senior year, students receive even more specialized training in health care, and assistance in completing university and financial aid applications.

More than 60 percent of the current students are “at-risk,” which means they fall into one or more categories that could hinder their educational development.  These students may have:

  • Scored below proficiency on standardized tests as ninth-graders
  • Completed their ninth grade year with a grade point average of 2.2 or lower
  • Not earned enough credits in ninth grade to graduate on time
  • Come from a low-income family
  • Frequently missed classes as ninth-graders

 

When they enter the Health Careers Academy, educators assess the students’ skills and immediately begin addressing the academic deficiencies and poor work habits that have hindered their success.

 

“The results have been exemplary,” Scott said. “Since 2000, all of our students have graduated on time.  More than half of the 2013 graduating class had completed all of the requirements to attend a public California University immediately after graduation, and nine of the 31 graduates received college scholarships.”

 

“The Canyon Springs Health Careers Academy has consistently produced students with a plethora of knowledge, genuine concern about all health issues and most importantly a passion to be proactive and responsive,” Dr. White said. “The level of student engagement and compassion for others has propelled this program above the rest. Students participating in this program live and breathe commitment to health.”

 

The academy also offers extra-curricular organizations.

 

The Health Occupations Students of America  (HOSA) is a national organization specifically for students in a vocational health careers education program such as the one offered by Health Careers Academy. Part of the school curriculum includes activities related to HOSA. It also meets outside of school hours. Through HOSA, the academy’s juniors and seniors compete against other schools’ health services academies in debates on biomedical ethics, and often win these debates.

 

Another extra-curricular organization is the Anti-Bullying Club, which Health Services Academy students created after attending a conference on bullying. This club gave a presentation to all ninth- and 10th-graders at Canyon Springs High School, and set up a week of anti-bullying lunchtime activities during the week of Feb. 25 – March 1, 2013.

 

While Health Services Academy frequently turns a struggling high school student into a successful health care professional, sometimes the results have been even more profound.

 

Scott recalls a student, who is still in the academy, had been living on the streets as a runaway when she started her sophomore year.

 

“She was, understandably, credit deficient,” Scott said.  “Health Careers Academy created a plan, which included credit recovery, summer school and online courses to put her back on track for graduation on time. This student also has expressed appreciation for having positive role models and serious-minded students in her life through the academy.”

 

Health Careers Academy students are encouraged to also enroll in courses offered by Riverside County Regional Occupations Program/Career Technical Education, as these lead to certification in health careers. By taking just one ROP course, students can be certified for an entry-level health care profession at the time of high school graduation.

 

The students usually have between 160 to 240 hours of internship experience by the time they graduate from high school. In the 2012-2013 school year, 27 of the 31 seniors had internships with either Riverside County Regional Medical Center, the Riverside County ROP/CTE, Charter Hospice or medical clinics.

 

In addition to the internships, all Health Careers Academy must perform 50 hours of community service yearly. Of the 150 total hours required over their three years in the academy, 50 must be in a hospital or other medical setting.

 

Some students provide more than twice the minimum required, which garners them recognition in the “HCA 300 Club” for their more than 300 hours of community service. Collectively, the school provided more than 6,000 hours of community service.

 

Although employable at high school graduation, most students in Health Services Academy move on to post-secondary education. The academy gives them a jump-start on that as well.

 

All of the vocational education courses they take as juniors and seniors, and the anatomy and physiology courses offered at the academy offer dual credit. Students who complete these courses with a grade of B or better can also receive credit at Moreno Valley College.

 

Moreno Valley Unified School District developed Health Careers Academy in 1995. Before then, it had determined health care careers were of great interest to its students of that time, and these careers would be in high demand in coming years. Now, almost 20 years later, the career field continues to be in high demand, and is an interest of many current MVUSD high school students.

 

In addition, Moreno Valley Unified School District worked with colleges, universities and employers to develop pathways. These higher learning institutions and medical field employers remain in partnership with Health Careers Academy, offering students mentoring, guest speakers and job shadowing opportunities.  UCR provides student mentors who regularly visit Health Service Academy to discuss their university experience, and to help the high-school students with college applications, financial aid forms, SAT preparation, class schedules and time management.

 

Canyon Springs Health Careers Academy  students in the CPR picture are Maria Trejo (compressions), Viridiana Vargas (phoning 911), and Tuesday Martin (giving breaths).

Canyon Springs Health Careers Academy students in the CPR picture are Maria Trejo (compressions), Viridiana Vargas (phoning 911), and Tuesday Martin (giving breaths).

Partners are Riverside County Regional Medical Center, the Riverside County Office of Education, the University of California, Riverside Health Sciences Partnership, Riverside Community College District (of which Moreno Valley College is a part), and Loma Linda University Medical Center.

 

For more information about Health Careers Academy, contact Sharon Scott at (951) 571-4768.

 

For more information on the Moreno Valley Unified School District’s call the District office at (951) 571-7500 or go to the website at MVUSD.net.

 

About the Moreno Valley Unified School District

Moreno Valley Unified School District, with 3,400 employees and 35,000 students.

 

Moreno Valley Unified School District’s mission is to prepare all students academically and socially to become productive members of society.

 

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11.07.2013 Moreno Valley Unified School District Comments Off on Moreno Valley Noon Rotary Club Annual Thanksgiving Feast

Moreno Valley Noon Rotary Club Annual Thanksgiving Feast

Moreno Valley Noon Rotary Club Annual Thanksgiving Feast

 

Who:               The Moreno Valley Noon Rotary Club will be having their annual Thanksgiving Feast on November 26th for those in need.

 

What:             Before Thanksgiving Feast.  Valley View and Moreno Valley High School students who are members of the Intereact Clubs will participate in serving the Thanksgiving Feast.

 

Interact is a club for youth ages 12-18 who want to connect with other young people in their community or school. Interact club members have fun while carrying out service projects and learning about the world. Interact clubs organize at least two service projects a year: one that benefits their community and one that encourages international understanding.

 

While Rotary clubs sponsor them, Interact clubs are largely self-sustaining, requiring little or no financial support from your club.

 

The chairperson for the Intereact Club is Ken Sims, and the Chair for the Thanksgiving Feast is Mary Ellen Horspool.

 

 

When:             Tuesday, November 16, 2013, 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

 

Where:           Wesleyan Methodist Church, 13300 Indian Street, Moreno Valley, CA

 

Donations:      If you are interested in helping out by donating a turkey, ham or canned vegetables please call: Maria Lozano, Career Technical Education, Moreno Valley Unified School District, Phone:  (951) 571-7560.

 

Media

Contact:         Carl M. Dameron – (909) 534-9500

08.13.2013 Moreno Valley Unified School District Comments Off on California CTA President Dean Vogel Likes Moreno Valley School District

California CTA President Dean Vogel Likes Moreno Valley School District

Moreno Valley Unified School District superintendent of schools Dr. Judy White and California CTA state president Dean Vogel at 2013 joint leadership summit.  Vogel spoke well of the direction the district is taking to increase student performance.

Moreno Valley Unified School District superintendent of schools Dr. Judy White and California CTA state president Dean Vogel at 2013 joint leadership summit.
Vogel said, “They are committed to breaking down the silos and walls to increase student learning. They are providing a model for the rest of us, an excellent example.”

 

(Moreno Valley, CA)  School Superintendents and teachers union presidents don’t always get along. So it was a surprise to many that Moreno Valley Unified School District Superintendent, Judy White invited the California Teachers Association President Dean Vogel to be the lead and keynote speaker at the final day of the districts 2013 Joint Leadership Summit.

 

“That’s the way do things now in Moreno Valley School District,” said Dr. White.  “We are in a partnership with our parents, teachers, administrators and staff to deliver the best education we can to our students.  It only makes sense to work with our teachers to make students education better.”

 

Drawing on his 39 years as an educator and award-winning counselor, Vogel has insights into many levels of public education gleaned from his rich experience as a public school teacher and counselor at the elementary and higher education levels. He has taught all elementary grades, including kindergarten, and has trained counselors and student teachers.

 

“Everything the research is telling us is that the way you do systemic transformation of our schools is that you get the entire community, all stakeholders, not just the teachers and not just the principal, to stand together with a common purpose and a common language. You treat all education stakeholders with respect and dignity. It’s a real team effort. It’s about the school board and the unions and parents all standing together so that you have a much better chance of success. That’s why I really like the theme of this Moreno Valley Unified School District initiative of collaborating and coaching and connecting,” said Vogel.

 

“They are committed to breaking down the silos and walls to increase student learning. They are providing a model for the rest of us, an excellent example. We’re all on the same team and we’re going to treat each other like members of a team. This is all about all for one, and one for all – everybody working together to help our students,” Vogel added.

 

Dr. White opened the two day leadership Summit by welcoming teachers, administrator and staff Back to School for the 2013-14 school years.

 

“Moreno Valley Unified School District is a place where “Excellence On Purpose” is our way of life. This marks my 36th year in education and it is such a pleasure to serve and live in Moreno Valley. Our team of educators continues to embrace what is in the best interest of students. We celebrate a continued increase in student knowledge and understanding proved by increases in our students test scores, graduation rates and college going rates,” said Dr. White.

“The goal of the two day training is to enhance skills of the education team and improve our leadership and problem solving skills,” said Assistant Superintendent of Education Services Dr. Martinrex Kedziora.

The two-day leadership Summit welcomed teachers, administrator and staff Back to School for the 2013-14 school years. “The goal of the two-day training is to enhance skills of the education team and improve our leadership and problem solving skills,” said Assistant Superintendent of Education Services Dr. Martinrex Kedziora.

 

“The goal of the two day training is to enhance skills of the education team and improve our leadership and problem solving skills,” said Assistant Superintendent of Education Services Dr. Martinrex Kedziora.

 

“The trainings are not one way, while they give us new insights and education tools they also get us all talking to each other about solving problems, recognizing differences and working together to improve student success and job satisfaction,’ said Dr. Kedziora.

 

School starts on August 14th for all schools in the Moreno Valley School District’s 39 schools and 35,000 students.

 

Moreno Valley Unified School District’s mission is to prepare all students academically and socially to become productive members of society.

 

For more information on the Moreno Valley Unified School District’s call the District office at (951) 571-7500 or go to their website at MVUSD.net.

 

For more information on the California Teachers Association call (650) 552-5307 or go online to CTA.org.

 

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