12.08.2016 The Salvation Army Comments Off on Keep The Bells Ringing This Christmas Season

Keep The Bells Ringing This Christmas Season

 

 

Photo 2 IMG_1652 Earl Perkins:  Mr. Earl Perkins stands with his kettle by the entry doors at the Food 4 Less market on Victoria Ave. and Highland Ave. in San Bernardino.   Earl is a Salvation Army Solider, and is in full uniform when he works. Earl has been with the Kansas City Salvation Army for over six years.  Earl moved to San Bernardino four months ago, and is now a member of the San Bernardino Corps.  Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

Photo 2 IMG_1652 Earl Perkins: Mr. Earl Perkins stands with his kettle by the entry doors at the Food 4 Less market on Victoria Ave. and Highland Ave. in San Bernardino. Earl is a Salvation Army Solider, and is in full uniform when he works. Earl has been with the Kansas City Salvation Army for over six years. Earl moved to San Bernardino four months ago, and is now a member of the San Bernardino Corps. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

 

(SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) The “miracle” of Christmas is repeated through the joy of caring and sharing. The San Bernardino Salvation Army (www.salvationarmyusa.org)  seek volunteers to Keep The Bells Ringing in Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino.

The nationally recognized shiny red kettle is an integral part of the Christmas scene, with millions of dollars donated each year to aid needy families, seniors, and the homeless, in keeping with the spirit of the season.

Photo 3 IMG_1590 Haskel and Claudia: Claudia Torres from San Bernardino and daughter Barbara, came by Macy’s to pick up some items, and decided to stop by the kettle to make a donation on her way out. Although Claudia had no idea what The Salvation Army uses the money for, she gave anyway. Claudia was informed all about the various ministries and how The Salvation Army helps feed the poor and homeless, and has a Transitional Living Center and Homeless shelter.

Photo 3 IMG_1590 Haskel and Claudia: Claudia Torres from San Bernardino and daughter Barbara, came by Macy’s to pick up some items, and decided to stop by the kettle to make a donation on her way out. Although Claudia had no idea what The Salvation Army uses the money for, she gave anyway. Claudia was informed all about the various ministries and how The Salvation Army helps feed the poor and homeless, and has a Transitional Living Center and Homeless shelter.

“This is a wonderful way to help disadvantaged people in our community, simply by volunteering as bell ringers,” said Major Daniel Henderson, commander of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino. “We’re looking for individuals, families and groups to spend a day at one of our more than 30 locations in our area.”

The Salvation Army began ringing its bells this year on Friday, Nov. 18 and continues from 10 a.m. through 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday until Christmas Eve.

Many volunteers ring two hours at a time, but groups are asked to provide ringers who can work in shifts for an entire day. Anyone who would like to donate a few hours of his or her time can volunteer.  Individuals under the age of 16 must be accompanied a parent or guardian.

Salvation Army Board member Carl Dameron rings the bells with his family.  Left to right: Malaika, Carl and Shaila.  Photo by Ricard Tomboc

Salvation Army Boardmember Carl M. Dameron Keeps the Bells Ringing with his family. Left to right: Malaika, Carl and Shaila. Photo by Ricard Tomboc

“The more people who volunteer, the fewer people the agency must hire,” said Major Henderson.  “Each volunteer who Keeps the Bells Ringing saves us $10 an hour.  That means more money raised in direct support of our services goes to families in need.”

Where does the money raised by the ringing bells in San Bernardino go?  The Salvation Army provides emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in  disasters such as fires and earthquakes.

For Christmas, the Salvation Army creates holiday food baskets for about 500 local families. On Christmas Eve, The Salvation Army of San Bernardino hosts a Christmas Dinner that historically provides a delicious meal to approximatly 300 people. Donations raised by volunteers who Keep The Bells Ringing  help make this possible.

The Corp has other need for your finial and food donations. “The San Bernardino Corps needs food every day for those at its Hospitality House and Transitional Living Center,” said Integrated Mission Coordinator Lieutenant Cathie McCulley.  Up to 100 family members stay in its transitional and emergency family shelters.

Photo 1 IMG_144 Shey Walmart:  Mr. Shey Holden takes his post at the front of the Walmart on Mt. Vernon Ave. in Colton.  Shey is a volunteer with The Salvation Army, and is planning on giving at least 30 hours this season.   Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

Photo 1 IMG_144 Shey Walmart: Mr. Shey Holden takes his post at the front of the Walmart on Mt. Vernon Ave. in Colton. Shey is a volunteer with The Salvation Army, and is planning on giving at least 30 hours this season. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

Up to 300 people who receive a free dinner served Sunday through Friday at 4:45 p.m. at The Transitional Living Center, 925 West 10th Street in San Bernardino. Your donations are needed to keep this program going.

To volunteer to Keep The Bells Ringing, call The Salvation Army at (909) 888-1336.

To donate to The Salvation Army online, go to: www.salvationarmyusa.org. To donate by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).

Donors may drop off turkeys, other food, cash or gift cards at the Salvation Army’s Corps Office at 2626 Pacific St., in San Bernardino, CA 92346, phone (909) 888-1336.

How the Bell Ringer campaign began:

Captain Joseph McFee, serving with the San Francisco Salvation Army Corps in 1891, wanted to serve Christmas dinner to the poor in his neighborhood. But he didn’t have money to do so.

As a sailor in Liverpool, England, Captain Mcfee saw people on the docks throw money into a large kettle called “Simpson’s Pot” to help the poor. He decided this might work in California too.

Captain Mcfee set up a kettle at the Oakland Ferry Landing, which operated a ferry that was, in those days, the only way across San Francisco Bay. He put a sign on the kettle saying “Keep the Pot Boiling” and raised enough money to serve the Christmas dinner.

His idea spread quickly, and by 1897 Salvation Army Corps nationwide were collecting money in kettles to serve the needy in their communities. Among the Salvation Army Corps collecting money this way before the turn of the 20th Century was The Salvation Army of San Bernardino, which formed in 1887.

 

About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and offers holistic programs for individuals of all. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has served San Bernardino and the Inland Empire  since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino.

Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local service number is (909) 888-1336.

Photo 4 IMG_1538 Haskel at Macys: Mr. Haskel Herndon is ringing his Christmas bell at the Macy’s department store at the Inland Center Mall.  Haskel greets every customer he comes in contact with.  Haskel opens the door for the ladies and for those with handfuls of packages!  Haskel has been a Soldier with the Salvation Army for 3 months now.  Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

Photo 4 IMG_1538 Haskel at Macys: Mr. Haskel Herndon is ringing his Christmas bell at the Macy’s department store at the Inland Center Mall. Haskel greets every customer he comes in contact with. Haskel opens the door for the ladies and for those with handfuls of packages! Haskel has been a Soldier with the Salvation Army for 3 months now. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

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11.30.2016 LaSalle Medical Associates Comments Off on Avoid Getting Sick – Wash Your Hands Like A Doctor

Avoid Getting Sick – Wash Your Hands Like A Doctor

Consider these key facts about hand washing from the CDC: •One in three of adults in the U.S. do not wash their hands after using the bathroom. • One in four adults don’t wash their hands after changing diapers.

Consider these key facts about hand washing from the CDC:
• One in three of adults in the U.S. do not wash their hands after using the bathroom.
• One in four adults don’t wash their hands after changing diapers.

 

(San Bernardino, Calif.) Clean hands save lives! It’s a simple message repeated by health care providers and agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to avoid getting sick.

Keeping hands clean is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of infection and illness, such as the common cold and influenza, says Dr. Albert Arteaga, president of LaSalle Medical Associates.

As you touch people, surfaces, pets and objects, you accumulate germs on your hands, and although it’s impossible to keep your hands germ-free, washing your hands frequently can help limit the transfer of germs.

“Just think about all the things you touch everyday. You come in contact with germs all the time, so there are many opportunities to wash your hands,’’ says Arteaga.

Consider these key facts about hand washing from the CDC:

  • One in three of adults in the U.S. do not wash their hands after using the bathroom.
  • One in four adults don’t wash their hands after changing diapers.
  • Less than half of Americans wash hands after cleaning after pets.
  • One in three of adults wash hands after sneezing/coughing.
  • Less than one in five adults washes their hands after touching money.
  • One in three E. coli occurrences is caused from not washing hands before handling food.

How to Wash

“If hands are kept clean, the transmission of germs from person to person is greatly reduced,” Arteaga says. “But just holding your hands under running water won’t do the trick. There are proper techniques to follow,” he continued.

The best way to effectively eliminate most germs, Dr. Arteaga says, is to wash your hands with soap and water for about 15 to 20 seconds, followed by a good rinse.

“Be sure to wash the backs of your hands, between your fingers where germs can hide, and under your fingernails,’’ Dr. Arteaga says. “You must scrub your hands vigorously for at least 15 to 20 seconds to remove germs.”

For those concerned about time, Dr. Arteaga suggests looking no further than the “ABC Song.” He says singing the “ABC Song,” which is about 20 seconds in length, is not only effective in timing your own hand washing but is a unique way to help children develop their vocabulary skills and understand the importance of proper hand washing.

As an extra precaution, when using public restrooms, Dr. Arteaga suggests drying your hands with a paper towel, using it to turn off the water. Then, before discarding the paper towel, use it to open or close the bathroom door.

In the event a sink and or soap and water are not available, Dr. Arteaga suggests using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer gel or wipes, which are also effective in eliminating germs. But, Dr. Arteaga also points out, soap and water is still best in removing germs and bacteria.

“Many people use alcohol-based hand sanitizers, but if there is visible dirt on your hands, the alcohol-based hand sanitizers are not going to be as effective,’’ he says. “You need to use soap and water to rinse the dirt off your hands. If your hands aren’t visibly dirty, and you do not have soap and water available, make sure the hand sanitizer contains at least 60 percent alcohol to be effective in killing most germs and viruses.”

When to Wash

Wash your hands before and after you eat, use the toilet, change a diaper, touch an animal, blow your nose, cough or sneeze, handle garbage and touch a computer screen or telephone.

Dr. Arteaga says it is also good practice to wash your hands after visiting a park, entering our homes, and using our computers and telephones.

“Repetition is the mother of conversation,’’ he says. “The more you repeat something, the more it becomes ingrained in you to do it. So we must continue to instruct people on the proper way to wash their hands so that they don’t forget.”

Dr. Arteaga and his wife, Maria, a registered nurse, founded LaSalle Medical Associates 32 years ago. He and his team of 120 health care professionals treat thousands of patients for infectious diseases, such as the common cold and seasonal influenza each year.

Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Abert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Abert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

LaSalle operates clinics in Fontana, Hesperia and San Bernardino.

LaSalle Medical Associates is an Independent Physicians Association (IPA), which has a membership of 1,900 health care professionals serving 190,000 patients in Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, Fresno, Kings, Madera, San Joaquin and Tulare counties.

For more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go on line to www.LasalleMedical.com.

 

About LaSalle Medical Associates

LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., operates four clinics employing more than 120 dedicated healthcare professionals, treating children, adults and seniors in San Bernardino County. LaSalle’s patients are primarily served by Med-Cal and Healthy Families and they also accept Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net and IEHP. LaSalle’s clinics are at 17577 Arrow Blvd. in Fontana, 16455 Main St. in Hesperia and 1505 West 17th St. and 565 N. Mt. Vernon Ave. in San Bernardino.

LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality patience care with more than 190,000 patient visits per year in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin and Tulare Counties.

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11.21.2016 The Salvation Army Comments Off on Free Thanksgiving Day Dinner At The Salvation Army for 138 Years

Free Thanksgiving Day Dinner At The Salvation Army for 138 Years

 

Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez. We are ready for Christmas Dinners.

Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez. We are ready for Christmas Dinners.  Photo by Ricardo Tomboc.

 

(SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) – Salvation Army chapters throughout the Inland Empire will serve Thanksgiving Day meals, to all that attend including those who are without fa ily or unable to provide a full-course turkey dinner for themselves.

The San Bernardino Corps has served Thanksgiving dinner for 138 years.

“We are pleased to prove God’s spirit of giving and provide a Thanksgiving Day dinner to those in need,” said Major Henderson, corps officer at the San Bernardino Corps. “We also welcome those who are familiar with the many other services we offer throughout the year.”

The San Bernardino Corps is the dinner at the Corps new headquarters at 2626 Pacific Avenue, San Bernardino, where it moved in August of 2015.

At many locations, including the San Bernardino Corps, these meals take place from 11 a.m.to 1 p.m., or until food runs out. Some locations will offer meals earlier and/or later in the day.

The Salvation Army relies mostly on donations, so food will vary somewhat at locations, but will include turkey or chicken, pies, stuffing or rice, cranberry sauce, pies, cakes, greens, and other side dishes.

“We always have plenty of donations for Thanksgiving, but if you’d like to bring some non-perishable food it is always welcomed,” said Major Henderson.

“In addition to our Thanksgiving Day meal, we serve dinners to about 75 homeless women and children every day, and to some 25 men who are currently taking advantage of our cold-weather shelter in the evenings,” said Lt. Cathie McCully

Chef Richie

The Cook Richie shows of his work sliced Turkey Brest ready to be served. Photo by Ricardo Tomboc

Six nights a week, we serve meals close to 200 hungry people, some who are homeless and some who have a place to live, but need help with food to pay for everything else.

“The Salvation Army, San Bernardino will be giving toys for hundreds of children and 600 families holiday food baskets a few days before Christmas,” said Lt. McCully

Other corps of The Salvation Army also plan Thanksgiving meals. Call one of the phone numbers listed below learn the time and location of meals in your area.

  • San Bernardino, 2626 Pacific Avenue, (909) 888-1336. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Riverside, 3695 First Street, (951) 784-3571. Wednesday, November 23 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Redlands, 838 Alta St., (909) 792-6868. Thursday, November 24 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Moreno Valley, 14075 Frederick St., (951) 653-9131. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Ontario, 1412 S. Euclid Ave., (909) 986-6748. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Victorville, 14585 La Paz Drive, (760) 245-2545. The Victorville Corps has traditionally served two Thanksgiving dinners, one at its headquarters and another in Apple Valley at the James A. Woody Community Center on 13467 Navajo Road.  Both meals are served Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Hemet, 340 S. Palm Ave., (951) 791-9495. Thursday, November 24th 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

If you wish to be a volunteer to help the Salvation Army this Thanksgiving and Christmas season, please call The Salvation Army nearest you or call (909) 888-1336.

About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

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All photos by Ricardo Tomboc, Salvation Army board member

11.03.2016 The Salvation Army Comments Off on Ring the Bells – Volunteers Needed for A Happy Christmas

Ring the Bells – Volunteers Needed for A Happy Christmas

 

 (SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) – On Friday November 18, The Salvation Army Corps of San Bernardino begins its annual “Red Kettle” Bell Ringing Campaign.  Bell Ringers at the familiar Red Kettles seek donations from local residents to help local families in need during this holiday season.

“Our goal is to raise $150,000 this year to help families have a Happy Christmas and to house the homeless, feed the hungry, and provide hope to the hopeless.  This is our major fundraiser for the year.  Last year we raised about $100,000 during the holiday season,” said Major Daniel Henderson.

“We are looking for volunteers to Ring the Bells and raise money for The Salvation Army to help the needy this holiday season,” said Major Henderson.  “When volunteers ‘Ring the Bells’ it increases the amount of money The Salvation Army has to help people in need.”

The Salvation Army is inviting local colleges, universities, social clubs, service groups, elected officials, singers, bands, local actors, clubs and companies to Ring the Bells at local retail stores.  People are signing up to help.

President Tomas Morales of California State University, San Bernardino and President Matthew Madrid of The Art Institute of California – Inland Empire are asking their students, staff and faculty to join the effort to Ring the Bells and help our local people in need.

 

“Assemblymember Cheryl Brown along with San Bernardino City Councilmember John Valdivia are the first elected officials who have volunteered to Ring the Bells this holiday season,” said Major Henderson.  Stater Bros. Markets, Under Armour and Target are also providing volunteers.

Festively-dressed volunteers ringing bells will be deployed to retail outlets in San Bernardino, Grand Terrace, Highland, Colton, Rialto and Bloomington.  “Some sing, some dance, some play instruments and some just use their wonderful smiles and the familiar silver bells to attract donations,” said Major Henderson.

The tradition of The Salvation Army “Kettle” during the Christmas Holidays was started in 1891 in San Francisco, by Captain Joseph McFee, in an effort to collect enough money to provide a free Christmas dinner to the poor. Now the tradition has spread worldwide. It has been in San Bernardino since its early years.

Steve Pinckney has volunteered his time ringing the bells as part of his ministry work with the Salvation Army Corps. Steve is graduate of the Salvation Army's Adult Rehabilitation Center and is participants in the Salvation Army Corps's Path-To-Prosperity program

Steve Pinckney has volunteered his time to Ring the Bells as part of his ministry work with the Salvation Army Corps. Steve is graduate of the Salvation Army’s Adult Rehabilitation Center and a past participants in the Salvation Army Corps’s Path-To-Prosperity program.

Donations collected during the Christmas kettle campaign in San Bernardino are used to provide food baskets and other essential during the Christmas season.  Donations are also used by The Salvation Army throughout the year to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; children’s afterschool and summer camp programs, assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available.

The Salvation Army volunteers will Ring the Bells at local locations including: Stater Bros. Markets, Walmart, Inland Center Mall, JC Penneys, Walgreens, Macy’s, Sam’s Club, CVS Pharmacy, Big Lots! and Ralphs.

The Salvation Army also needs donations of toys for children’s Christmas gifts, along with turkeys, hams, stuffing, canned goods, vegetables, pies, cakes and other food for Thanksgiving and Christmas dinners and food baskets.

“We always need food donations,” said Major Henderson.  “We serve meals to about 300 people a day at our Homeless Shelter, Transitional Living Center, Path to Prosperity Program and free meals every day at 4:45, so food goes fast.  We also need donations for our annual free Thanksgiving and Christmas meals, served every year since 1887.”

Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at  The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez.  We are ready for Christmas Dinners.

Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez. We are ready for Christmas Dinners.

To volunteer, or if companies who want to donate the staffing of a location to Ring the Bells and help the needy this holiday season, call Lt. Cathie McCulley at The San Bernardino Salvation Army at (909) 888-1336.

 

About The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

 

Roslyn Billings (Salvation Army Advisory Board member)  and family volunteer as a Salvation Army bellringer! If your family, organization or business can supply enough people to ring bells at one of the San Bernardino Corps Red Kettle locations for an entire day, please volunteer by calling (909) 888-1336.

Roslyn Billings (Salvation Army Advisory Board member) and family volunteer Ring the Bells as a Salvation Army bellringer! If your family, organization or business can ring the bells at one of the San Bernardino Corps Red Kettle locations for an entire day, please volunteer by calling Lt. Cathie at (909) 888-1336.

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10.29.2016 Deborah Robertson Comments Off on Rialto Mayor Robertson – Why I Run

Rialto Mayor Robertson – Why I Run

Mayor Robertson, Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson,

Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson, said. “When I took office, my goals were to stabilize our financial future, improve the economic and business development in Rialto, create greater job opportunities, hire the local workforce and make Rialto a safe place to live, work and play.”

 

(Rialto, Calif.)  Newly retired, Deborah Robertson drove around Rialto and quickly decided what she would do with all that “free time.” She put all her efforts in running for mayor.

Four years later and one term as mayor, Mayor Robertson is still working to keep Rialto moving in the right direction. During her first term, which began in 2012, economic opportunities went up while crime went down. Her collaboration with neighboring cities along the Interstate 10 corridor will result in better traffic flow, even as more industrial jobs take root in the area.

“I feel the role of mayor is a calling, not just a title,” said Mayor Robertson, who was a three-term city councilwoman before her first term as mayor. “When I took office, my goals were to stabilize our financial future, improve the economic and business development in Rialto, create greater job opportunities, hire the local workforce and make Rialto a safe place to live, work and play.”

“Today, our businesses are on the rise, a greater number of residents are part of the local workforce, crime statistics are down and we as a community have made a tremendous commitment to improving our streets and roads.”

In working on the needs of the city, Mayor Robertson leaned on her vast experience. A native Californian, Mayor Robertson holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning and a master’s degree in Public Administration. Before retiring, she was the Deputy District Director of External Affairs for the California Department of Transportation (Caltrans).

Partnering with the cities of Fontana, Colton and San Bernardino, the focus has been on economic development and the creation of jobs in the fields of technology, transportation along with commercial endeavors.

“A major accomplishment has been attracting businesses to this city and the surrounding communities,” Mayor Robertson said. “We focus on where we are (geographically). The footprint has been cast. Anything that goes from the ports to the rest of the United States – 90 percent of it has to pass through the Inland Empire. We need to see the technology of moving goods and make sure the skill sets for these jobs are transferred into our community so our people are competitive.”

The biggest project for the city is the Renaissance at the north end of Rialto, formerly Rialto Airport. Through legislation, the city was able to redirect aviation activity to San Bernardino International Airport (Formerly Norton Air Force Base). More than 1,500 acres are being redeveloped into housing, commercial, industrial and entertainment areas, also bringing tax revenue and jobs.

“Rialto is the jewel of the Inland Empire,” Mayor Robertson said. “I have a plan and I want to continue to execute the plan to move Rialto forward.”

For more information about Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson go to: http://www.DeborahRobertson.org.

About Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson

Deborah Robertson was elected Mayor of Rialto in November 2012 – the latest achievement in a distinguished public service career that has included 12 years on the Rialto City Council, leadership positions at the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), and more than 20 years with the California Department of Transportation.

Under Mayor Robertson’s leadership, Rialto has gained regional and national recognition for innovation in the areas of public-private partnerships, business development and job creation. The City’s refinancing and restructuring of its water and wastewater operations has become a model for other communities in California, pumping millions of dollars into the local economy.

Mayor Robertson retired from Caltrans in 2011, as Deputy District Director of External Affairs. A native Californian, she holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning from the University of California, San Diego, a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the City University of New York Bernard Baruch College and is a National Urban Fellows recipient. She is also a scholarship recipient and past participant of the Southern California Leadership Network.

Mayor Robertson has two children and six grandchildren, that are the joy of her life.

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10.19.2016 Deborah Robertson Comments Off on Rialto Mayor Robertson #RialtoPride

Rialto Mayor Robertson #RialtoPride

 

Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson told the students to challenge anyone with a negative image of their city. In turn, the teens put out the hashtag #RialtoPride and it immediately began trending among local students. The conversations started to center around why they love Rialto and a movement was begun.

Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson told the students to challenge anyone with a negative image of their city. In turn, the teens put out the hashtag #RialtoPride and it immediately began trending among local students. The conversations started to center around why they love Rialto and a movement was begun.

 

(Rialto, Calif.) She is not from the generation that made Twitter-speak common, but Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson certainly knows her way around a hashtag.

High schoolers and young voters have taken Mayor Robertson’s re-election slogan of #RialtoPride and soon it morphed it into a new nickname for the incumbent mayor — #MayorGetItDoneRobertson.

Mayor Robertson is running for her second term as mayor, and fifth term in Rialto city government. Election Day is November 8. She is also Rialto’s first Black Mayor.

Mayor Robertson chuckled about the name given to her originally by some Rialto High School students after spending the day with her during a mock city council. It shows that beyond economic development and crime statistics, Mayor Robertson – a nearly 30-year resident – has a deep-rooted pride in her city.

“I feel the negative images of cities are often portrayed in TV shows such as ‘Cops,’ “Mayor Robertson said. “Often you see a negative image, yet crime continues to decrease in Rialto. But negatives get the program ratings.”

Mayor Robertson pointed out that in the past five years, violent crime in Rialto has steadily declined and according to city-data.com, Rialto fell below the national average in 2014 and crime continues to drop. Rialto now ranks among the top half in safest communities in San Bernardino County, city-data.com also shows. The unemployment rate in Rialto has steadily dropped since 2013, according to homefact.com and the rate is now at seven percent.

Raised in a military community in San Diego, Mayor Robertson said she learned civic pride at an early age. When new kids came to her elementary school and turned their nose up, she quickly set them straight.

“I grew up in a military town and trying to assimilate into an existing group is stressful,” Mayor Robertson said. “Kids would come in and put us down. Most kids would just listen and feel bad. My friend and I were equalizers. We told them if they didn’t like it, go back to where they came from.”

It was at this mock city council day a year ago that the idea of promoting “Rialto Pride” was initiated. Mayor Robertson said students were starting to ask questions, including why some people weren’t more positive about Rialto.

“I told them, ‘If you don’t stand up for Rialto, who is going to stand up for Rialto?’ “Mayor Robertson said. “You can lead or you can be led. That’s your choice.”

She told the students to challenge anyone with a negative image of their city. In turn, the teens put out the hashtag #RialtoPride and it immediately began trending among local students. The conversations started to center around why they love Rialto and a movement was begun.

For more information about Mayor Deborah Robertson go to: http://www.DeborahRobertson.org.

 

About Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson

Deborah Robertson was elected Mayor of Rialto in November 2012 – the latest achievement in a distinguished public service career that has included 12 years on the Rialto City Council, leadership positions at the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), and more than 20 years with the California Department of Transportation.

Under Mayor Robertson’s leadership, Rialto has gained regional and national recognition for innovation in the areas of public-private partnerships, business development and job creation. The City’s refinancing and restructuring of its water and wastewater operations has become a model for other communities in California, pumping millions of dollars into the local economy.

Mayor Robertson retired from Caltrans in 2011, as Deputy District Director of External Affairs. A native Californian, she holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning from the University of California, San Diego, a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the City University of New York Bernard Baruch College and is a National Urban Fellows recipient. She is also a scholarship recipient and past participant of the Southern California Leadership Network.

Mayor Robertson has two children and six grandchildren, that are the joy of her life.

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10.10.2016 Dameron Communications Comments Off on Time for Norris P Gregory Park

Time for Norris P Gregory Park

Norris P. Gregory Jr., 85, the first black council member in the city of San Bernardino, died April 21, 2011. (This is a reporter photograph of a photograph.) (04/28/2011, None / The Press-Enterprise)

    Norris P. Gregory Jr., 85, the first black council member in the  of San Bernardino, died April 21, 2011. (This is a reporter photograph of a photograph.) (04/28/2011, None / The Press-Enterprise)

 

(San Bernardino, Calif.). There is a nomination for naming the 2.5 acre multi-use park on E Street between 9th and 10th streets, Norris P. Gregory Park.

The park will be maintained by the San Bernardino Valley Municipal Water District. It will have sitting areas, an outdoor fitness exercise area, playgrounds, picnic areas, basketball court, skateboard area, multi-use field, walkways and splash pad.

It is being built with a $5 million grant and will be ready for use at the beginning of 2017.  Below is a bullet list of accomplishments for Mr. Gregory who died in 2002.
Norris Paige Gregory, Jr.

• He was a resident of San Bernardino from 1958 to his death at the age of 85 in 2011
• Elected and served as San Bernardino City’s first African American councilman also making him the first African American elected official in San Bernardino County.
• Served the 6th Ward for 2 terms starting in 1967 to 1975
• He was a member of the NAACP, the Urban League, the Mexican Chamber of Commerce as well as the VFW and American Legion
• The San Bernardino and California Teachers Associations and an Honorary Mason.
• He owned a business up until his death on the Westside.
• He served with the Redevelopment Agency
• He was an assistant district administrator for the office of Congressman George E. Brown, Jr.
• He was a teacher and administrator for San Bernardino City Unified School district
• He was an activist working for improving the underserved and minorities in San Bernardino

“I am trying to collect 100 signatures from San Bernardino residents’” said Vera Campbell . “I have an application to fill out and then I turn it in for City Council to approve. I don’t think there is much competition but getting those 100 signatures is proving difficult. I started something that I will see to the end. My phone number is 909-804-1021 if you have suggestions.”

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10.10.2016 Deborah Robertson Comments Off on Rialto Mayor Robertson Runs for Second Term

Rialto Mayor Robertson Runs for Second Term

 

 

Mayor Robertson’s reason for wanting a second term is simple. “I’m not done.”

In her first term, Mayor Robertson accomplished much of what she wanted. Her focus was on keeping Rialto financially sound, moving forward on commercial and business development, generating jobs in Rialto and enhancing open space for healthy recreational usage.

In her first term, Mayor Deborah Robertson accomplished much of what she wanted. Her focus was on keeping Rialto financially sound, moving forward on commercial and business development, generating jobs in Rialto and enhancing open space for healthy recreational usage.

(Rialto, Calif.) As Deborah Robertson moves from table to table greeting folks at Mary Stewart’s Southern Soul Food, the Mayor of Rialto looks as comfortable as if she was in her own kitchen.

In a way, she is. Mayor Robertson has called Rialto home for nearly 30 years and has served in its local government for 16 years, including three terms as a councilwoman and one as Mayor.

As she campaigns for re-election – Election Day is Nov. 8 – Mayor Robertson’s reason for wanting a second term is simple. “I’m not done.”

“I feel the role of the Mayor is a calling, not just a title,” said Mayor Robertson, who is running against current councilmember Ed Palmer. “We keep it real in Rialto. Our foundation is in a common belief of community. We’re middle class, salt of the earth people.”

In her first term, Mayor Robertson accomplished much of what she wanted. Her focus was on keeping Rialto financially sound, moving forward on commercial and business development, generating jobs in Rialto and enhancing open space for healthy recreational usage.

“The community as a whole is concerned about safety and lowering crime in the city,” said Mayor Robertson. Cutting down on crime was also a major focus in her first term as Mayor.

“I am very proud of the part the city’s police force played in response to the terrorist attack nine months ago in San Bernardino,” said Mayor Robertson. Rialto’s SWAT Team was one of the first responders in support of San Bernardino’s units.

During her time as Mayor, Rialto was also one of the first cities to have its police force wear body cameras. “As the result of a research project, the Rialto police agreed to wear the cameras for one year,” said Mayor Robertson. The results were positive and Rialto decided to keep the cameras. Robertson said it gave citizens a new perspective into law enforcement.

“It gave us empirical data, not just anecdotal,” Mayor Robertson said. “The number of complaints from citizens went down drastically. It brought about a different level of respect for the police.”

Statistically, both violent crime and property crime have gone down in each year of Robertson’s first term as Mayor.

In 2014, Rialto dropped below the national average in violent crime rate for the first time in 12 years, according to City-Data.com. Mayor Robertson is also one of four Mayors in San Bernardino County that have been very vocal about the illegal gun problem.

For more information about Mayor Deborah Robertson go to: http://www.DeborahRobertson.org.

 

About Rialto Mayor Deborah Robertson

Deborah Robertson was elected Mayor of Rialto in November 2012 – the latest achievement in a distinguished public service career that has included 12 years on the Rialto City Council, leadership positions at the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), the San Bernardino Associated Governments (SANBAG), and more than 20 years with the California Department of Transportation.

Under Mayor Robertson’s leadership, Rialto has gained regional and national recognition for innovation in the areas of public-private partnerships, business development and job creation. The City’s refinancing and restructuring of its water and wastewater operations has become a model for other communities in California, pumping millions of dollars into the local economy.

A leading voice on regional and national infrastructure issues, Mayor Robertson chairs the Public Health Subcommittee for SCAG’s 2016 Regional Transportation Plan/Sustainable Communities Strategy, is a member of the U.S. Conference of Mayors Water Council and Metro Economies, and member of Mayors Against Illegal Guns.

She is a founding board member for the NFL/AFL Youth Life Skills Camp, has hosted the annual State of Women event in Rialto for the past seven years, and was recognized by Assembly Member Cheryl Brown as 47th District Woman of the Year.

Mayor Robertson retired from Caltrans in 2012, most recently serving as Deputy District Director of External Affairs. A native Californian, she holds an undergraduate degree in Urban Planning from the University of California, San Diego, a Masters Degree in Public Administration from the City University of New York Bernard Baruch College and is a National Urban Fellows recipient. She is also a scholarship recipient and past participant of the Southern California Leadership Network.

Mayor Robertson was instrumental in developing Rialto’s Transportation Commission and coordinated a transportation summit for the region.  Her wielding influence and determination have helped bring new businesses and housing to the City of Rialto.

With all that she has done Mayor Robertson still has the time for family, two children and six grandchildren, that are the joy of her life.

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08.31.2016 Dameron Communications Comments Off on Dameron Communications Wins California Excellence Award

Dameron Communications Wins California Excellence Award

 

Carl Dameron at a recent award ceremony.

Carl Dameron, president of Dameron Communications at a recent award ceremony.

 

Dameron Communications has been selected for the 2016 California Excellence Award amongst all its peers and competitors by the American Economic Institute (AEI).

“I am honored to receive this prestigious award for a lifetime of work in public relations and advertising,” said Dameron.

Each year the AEI conducts business surveys and industry research to identify companies that have achieved demonstrable success in their local business environment and industry category. They are recognized as having enhanced the commitment and contribution of small businesses through service to their customers and community. Companies of this caliber enhance the consumer driven stature that California is renowned for.

Dameron Communications has consistently demonstrated a high regard for upholding business ethics and company values. This recognition by AEI marks a significant achievement as a leader within various competitors and is setting benchmarks that the industry should follow.

As part of the industry research and business surveys, various sources of information were gathered and analyzed to choose the selected companies in each category. This research is part of an exhaustive process that encapsulates a year long immersion in the business climate of California.

About AEI

The AEI is a leading authority on researching, evaluating and recognizing companies across a wide spectrum of industries that meet its stringent standards of excellence. It has spearheaded the idea of independent enterprise and entrepreneurial growth allowing businesses of all sizes to be recognized locally and encouraged globally.

Particular emphasis is given to meeting and exceeding industry benchmarks for customer service, product quality and ethical practices. Industry leading standards and practices have been developed and implementation of the same has been pioneered by the dedicated efforts of the business community and commerce leadership.

More information on AEI can be found at www.aefgh.org

07.25.2016 The Salvation Army Comments Off on Salvation Army: Resources Needed to Aid Families in Transition

Salvation Army: Resources Needed to Aid Families in Transition

 

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY or (909) 888-1336.

Volunteers help serve 52,504 free, hot, nutritious meals were served to the hungry from The Salvation Army in San Bernardino. Now the corps needs help to fund services.

San Bernardino, Calif. – The Inland Empire branch of the Salvation Army today issued an urgent appeal to the community for resources to provide support to area families in need. The San Bernardino Citadel Corps, which serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto and San Bernardino, is reporting a financial deficit of $45,000 (now $90,000), citing a shift in contributions following the December 2 terrorist attack.

The public is encouraged to donate money, food, and goods and services to help replenish Salvation Army coffers, and to consider including the Salvation Army in their charitable giving and estate plans. Contributions can be made online at www.SalvationArmyUSA.org or by calling 1-800-SAL-ARMY.

“The Salvation Army is proud to have been a part of the community outpouring of support to the victims and families affected by the December 2 tragedy,” said Anne Metu, program director for the organization’s Transitional Living Center. “Now, we are asking the community to help us rebuild our resources so that we can continue providing assistance to families with urgent needs for food, shelter and child care.”

Metu cited an example of a family—a mother and her six children, ages 3 to 13—who relied on the Salvation Army Emergency Shelter and Transitional Living Program when evicted from their home: “Mona” and the children’s father had separated and she did not have sufficient income to house, feed and clothe the family.

After a short stay in the shelter, she found employment and was accepted into transitional housing, but soon lost her job when she could not find childcare during the children’s Spring Break from school. With support from the staff and residents at the Transitional Living Program, Mona was able to return to work and was soon reunited with the children’s father.

Mona and her husband now live in affordable housing as a family unit and the children continue to participate in Salvation Army youth programs, mentoring other children who are faced with similar life circumstances.

Since 1887, the San Bernardino Corps has helped residents of the San Bernardino area overcome life’s challenges. Its current service area is San Bernardino, Highland, Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace and Rialto.

Donations may always be made online at www.SalvationArmyUSA.org, or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.

For help or for more information call Ms. Anne Metu, Program Director at the Transitional Living Center, (909) 888-4880 or anne.metu@usw.salvationarmy.org or visit the Website at: www.salvationarmyusa.org

About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps
The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest, and most effective, charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination.

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