07.31.2017 The Salvation Army Comments Off on 70:70 Ride A Cycling Trip Through San Bernardino

70:70 Ride A Cycling Trip Through San Bernardino

70:70Ride - San Bernardino

Ray Anderson, along with San Bernardino Mayor Carey Davis and Major Dan Henderson of The Salvation Army Corps will cycle their bikes through San Bernardino in the 70:70K Ride on Saturday, October 14. The goal is to raise $70,000 to purchase and rehab up to four houses for The Salvation Army’s “Path to Prosperity” program. Photos by: Larinda Jungjohann

70:70Ride a bicycle trip through the streets of San Bernardino to raise money for The Salvation Army’s Path to Prosperity transitional living program

(San Bernardino, Calif.) When talking about San Bernardino, its reputation often precedes it. Words like poverty and crime roll off the tongue too easily. Then came the worst massacre in the United States since 9/11 and the City of San Bernardino was once again in the news. And the news was not good.

Ray Anderson, a business coach by trade and Salvation Army advisory board member, knew the negative images of his city were indelibly etched in the minds of people around the world. Adding terrorism to the list didn’t help. He wanted to see San Bernardino celebrated, not mourned or worse, ignored.

On the eve of his 70th birthday, the wheels started turning.

“We want to turn a negative image into something positive and uplifting,” Anderson said. “I’m committed to a personal effort to demonstrate that one person acting in faith can change the course of a family, a neighborhood and a community.

“Specifically, I want to do something to unite people behind the transformation of San Bernardino and show off the good sides of the town. I just turned 70, so how about I bike 70 kilometers through the city?”

Anderson, along with San Bernardino Mayor Carey Davis and Major Dan Henderson of The Salvation Army Corps will cycle their bikes through San Bernardino in the 70:70K Ride on Saturday, October 14.

The goal is to raise $70,000 to purchase and rehab up to four houses for The Salvation Army’s “Path to Prosperity” program.  Through the program men have a safe, sober home to rent live in the while they compete their education, a job training and maintain a job while rebuilding their “spirit, family and life.”.

The Path to Prosperity is open to any man who has successfully completed a substance abuse treatment program and can prove he has lived clean and sober for the last six months.

70:70 - San Bernardino

Ray Anderson, along with San Bernardino Mayor Carey Davis and Major Dan Henderson of The Salvation Army Corps will cycle their bikes through San Bernardino in the 70:70K Ride on Saturday, October 14. The goal is to raise $70,000 to purchase and rehab up to four houses for The Salvation Army’s “Path to Prosperity” program. Photos by: Larinda Jungjohann

“The Path to Prosperity program is a final step to transform men with little hope into contributing members of the community,” Anderson said.

The Path to Prosperity is currently limited to 30 men for the 18-month program.  The need is so great that there is a waiting list of those hoping to join when space is available.  The addition of four new homes will enable Path to Prosperity program to serve as many as 25 men on the waiting list.

Anderson said the Path to Prosperity program has more than a decade of successfully returning 91 percent of clients, more than 323 graduates, back on the community, sober and self-sufficient.  He hopes to get as many people involved as he can to support the program, both through donations and the ride itself.

A goal of 250 cyclists, led by San Bernardino Mayor Carey Davis, will navigate through the city and pass by some of the spots that make San Bernardino unique.

The ride cruises along Historic Route 66, passes by the Little League West Regional Diamond, Cal State San Bernardino, San Manuel Casino, the International Airport, the 66ers San Manuel Stadium and ends at San Bernardino City Hall.

A Vietnam veteran, Anderson said he remembers what it was like to come home to a less-than-welcoming environment. But work was plentiful. Now, the opposite is greeting our veterans, Anderson said.

“Regardless of age, each of us can encourage and inspire others to pick up the gauntlet of change that will enable a new generation to reach for the stars with a simple act of focused giving,” Anderson said. “Specifically, I wanted to do something to unite people behind the transformation of San Bernardino.”

70:70Ride - San Bernardino

Ray Anderson will cycle along Historic Route 66, pass by the Little League West Regional Diamond, Cal State San Bernardino, San Manuel Casino, the International Airport, the 66ers San Manuel Stadium and ends at San Bernardino City Hall. Photos by: Larinda Jungjohann

“The goal is to help men in trouble rebuild their lives through education or job training and return to society.  Instead of costing us $45,000 a year, recovered men can now contribute $30,000 or more to our local economy every year,” said Anderson.

People can participate in a number of ways. Everyone is invited to ride along, even if only for short segments. Riders can ask friends and family to support their effort with an on-line donation at various levels.

“You can contribute directly to the campaign at The Salvation Army link: 7070Ride.weebly.com,” said Anderson.

The cost to join the 70:70 Ride is $70 per rider.

“Realistically, I may never know the impact my chosen path made on the people, the city or those in the world around me,” Anderson said. “What I do know is unconditional love shown to me by family, friends and good-hearted people I’ve never met, compel me to return that love to a world desperately seeking it.”

For more information, on the 70:70 Ride call Cesar Gomez at (909) 230-292. Or Register to ride at 70:70Ride.weebly.com   For information on the Path to Prosperity Program call the San Bernardino Corps headquarters at (909) 888-1336.

Men seeking help to overcome drug or alcohol addiction should call their local Adult Rehabilitation Centers at (909) 889-9605 in San Bernardino County or (951) 940-5790 in Riverside County.

 

About The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Radio Network assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.

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07.03.2017 Cal State San Bernardino Comments Off on Oh, the Places You’ll Go

Oh, the Places You’ll Go

Dean Dr. Rafik Mohamed. the Places You’ll Go

“We want to get the word out, in a fun way, that we’re doing all these phenomenal things in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at California State University in San Bernardino,” said Dean Dr. Rafik Mohamed.

As Dr. Seuss would say, “Congratulations! Today is your day. You’re off to great places! You’re off and away!”

(San Bernardino, CA) The illustrations are bright and quirky. The text is filled with simple words a first grader could read aloud. But the deeper meaning behind the Dr. Seuss masterpiece “Oh, the Places You’ll Go” has sent many a university graduate on their way to a new chapter in life.

The book became a theme for showcasing the students in the College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at California State University in San Bernardino. Dean Dr. Rafik Mohamed ran the idea past Director of Development Stephen Arneson and they identified five students – Julie Leyba, Meghan Streeter, Richard Bark, Rocio Gomez and Joseph Egbule – to represent its diverse graduating class of 2017.

“We wanted to get the word out, in a fun way, that we’re doing all these phenomenal things,” Mohamed said. “This book has been a graduation present for years. It’s a wonderful book and it’s a book that opens up the idea of opportunity. We know that life isn’t easy and all sunshine and roses like Dr. Seuss said it is. But it reminds you that I can do or be or accomplish anything I want.”

For all their differences, the five students also had lot in common. They each credit that special person that pushed, pulled and prodded them to go beyond what they thought they could. They leaned on friends they met at CSUSB, with study sessions that included copious notes, cups of coffee and sleepless nights.

They’ve paid late fees, lab fees and parking fees with a smile and gave their fitbit fits, logging thousands of steps a day navigating an ever-growing campus.

So, as Dr. Seuss would say, “Congratulations! Today is your day. You’re off to great places! You’re off and away!”

Julie Leyba 2017

Public policy is a broad term for making a difference in government. Julie Leyba plans on attending law school following her time working in Washington D.C. as the recipient of the prestigious 2017 Panetta Internship.

Julie Leyba, BA Political Science, 2018

“You have brains in your head. You have feet in your shoes. You can steer yourself any direction you choose.”

Public policy is a broad term for making a difference in government. Julie Leyba plans on attending law school following her time working in Washington D.C. as the recipient of the prestigious 2017 Panetta Internship.

While at school, Leyba was challenged by Dr. Al Mariam. But at home, her driving force was her older sister, Erica.

The sisters lost their father and are caregivers for their mother as she battles Multiple Sclerosis. It was Erica that told Julie that her education came first.

“She has become my second mother, supporting me mentally and emotionally,” Leyba said. “I can’t always help take care of my mom and I feel guilty sometimes, but my sister said, ‘No matter what, you’re getting your education and don’t let anything stop you.’ ”

In her words: “Attending CSUSB has been an enriching and rewarding experience.  Particularly, the Department of Political Science’s student-oriented faculty and rigorous and comprehensive curriculum have both inspired and prepared me to pursue graduate studies in public policy.  I have additionally been encouraged through my supportive network of fellow students who have helped me balance my academic, work, and personal life. I look forward to representing CSUSB well in Washington D.C. this fall.”

 

Meghan Sheeran

Meghan Streehant graduated with a BA in Social Work 2017

Meghan Streehan, BA Social Work 2017

“You’re on your own. And you know what you know. And YOU are the guy who’ll decide where to go.” 

Raised in the Inland Empire, Meghan Streehan kept close to her support system – her family. Her mom had always pushed her to be more and she started her college career near home at Norco College.

Fresh faced and more than a little nervous, Streehan transferred to CSUSB with a goal of better understanding human relationships and helping others. She credits professors Andrew Watson and Emily Shum for encouraging her to look at the world from a different perspective.

The supportive environment created a home away from home for Streehan and inspired her to complete her first degree.

Streehan will head up north to Humboldt State to earn her Master’s Degree in Serving Rural and Native American Communities. Her dream is a career on a reservation in Northern California serving Native American communities.

In her words: “When I first stepped on campus two years ago, I was overwhelmed by how large it was, and how out of place I felt. Today, CSUSB is like a second home. The faculty and staff of the School of Social Work have always been there to support me, and my future educational and professional goals. I’m leaving here passionate about my chosen profession, with happy memories, and great friendships.”

Bark 2017

Richard Bark has logged plenty of miles in his quest for higher education.
Giving new meaning to the words “commuter school,” Bark came to CSUSB to earn his master’s in Applied Archaeology. His bachelor’s degree came from his hometown school, University of California, San Diego. He currently works for the Navy in San Diego.

Richard Bark, Masters Applied Archaeology, 2017

“You’ll be on your way up! You’ll be seeing great sights! You’ll join the high flyers who soar to high heights.”

Richard Bark has logged plenty of miles in his quest for higher education.

Giving new meaning to the words “commuter school,” Bark came to CSUSB to earn his master’s in Applied Archaeology. His bachelor’s degree came from his hometown school, University of California, San Diego. He currently works for the Navy in San Diego.

Daunting drive aside, Bark credits his wife’s support and his professors, Dr. Amy Gusick and Dr. Peter Robershaw in building a challenging yet practical foundation of method and theory. He has worked in the Cultural Resources Management field for more than 20 years, managing contracts and consulting with the California Historic Preservation Office and different tribes in the area. Bark said the graduate degree CSUSB offered was exactly what he’d been looking for.

Bark believes that his discipline to commute to CSUSB from either Edwards Air Force Base or San Diego, coupled with the degree being an extension of the work he already loves, drove him to be successful in this field.

In his words: “I’m an Archaeologist who has been working in the cultural resources management (CRM) field for more than 20 years, and the Applied Archaeology program offered at CSUSB is the graduate program I’ve been looking for that entire time. As a two-year program, the coursework is demanding and students are continually challenged by the instructors to think critically in order to solve problems that are based on real world examples. However, for those willing to put in the work, the result is well worth the effort. In my case, I have no doubt that my being in the CSUSB Applied Archaeology program contributed heavily to me having recently been hired as an archaeologist by the Department of the Navy.”

Rocio Gomez 2017

A first-generation college student, Rocio Gomez set an example for family and friends alike. She spent much of her time working during college, studying in her free time. In addition, Rocio was very active in the History Club and tutored Upward Bound students for two years.

Rocio Gomez BA History 2016

“So be sure when you step. Step with care and great tact. And remember that Life’s a Great Balancing Act.”

A first-generation college student, Rocio Gomez set an example for family and friends alike. She spent much of her time working during college, studying in her free time. In addition, Rocio was very active in the History Club and tutored Upward Bound students for two years.

Her passion for helping others mixed with her personal philosophy of life being “all about the impact that we leave.”

Rocio loved Dr. Jeremy Murray’s Chinese History class, mostly because it evoked so many emotions that she had to learn more. Currently, Rocio has been working with the Lake Elsinore School District but will move to a summer internship position at Manzanar National Historic Site. Her dream is to be a park ranger, with an opportunity to help people and the nature that serves them.

In her words: “Becoming a historian has taught me that, no matter where I am in life, I have a responsibility to remain engaged with the community that helped me become who I am. Whether I was doing work as a club leader, an Upward Bound tutor, or a regular student, there was always support and encouragement from some of the faculty, staff, and peers. If you want to make an impact, CSUSB is a good place to start.”

Joseph Egbule 2017

From his home in Rancho Cucamonga, family support helped Joseph Egbule thrive at CSUSB. The school and his professors taught him to “think out of the box,” taking in all circumstances to understand a situation. His time at the university also shaped some of his political beliefs.

Joseph Egbule, BA Political Science 2017

“And will you succeed? Yes! You will, indeed! (98 ¾ guaranteed)”

From his home in Rancho Cucamonga, family support helped Joseph Egbule thrive at CSUSB. The school and his professors taught him to “think out of the box,” taking in all circumstances to understand a situation. His time at the university also shaped some of his political beliefs.

For his part, Egbule said his positive attitude and dedication, along with really good memorization skills, lead him to follow his dreams.

Egbule will move on to law school at the University of Southern California School.  After graduation, he plans to pursue his long-term goal of becoming a partner in a Los Angeles-based law firm. His dream is to be part of the in-house legal counsel for a large corporation, such as Google.

In his words: “I believe that Cal State San Bernardino was a big part of my success. I value the bonds I have made with the people here. As I go into the next chapter of my life at law school, I feel confident in my abilities thanks to the lessons I have learned at Cal State.”

The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences (CSBS) offers nationally ranked programs that explore a wide range of human issues. It is dedicated to the growth and support of undergraduate and graduate education, research, public service, and professional development.

“We are confident that a degree in one of our academic programs will provide students with the professional integrity and knowledge to communicate effectively across disciplines and cultures. Our primary mission is to transform the dreams of our students into a reality that will enhance society at large,” said Dr. Mohamed.

“We offer students the breadth of a traditional and innovative education in the social sciences while preparing them for a wide range of professions, for graduate school, and for advanced professional study in fields such as criminal justice, political science, law, clinical psychology, and economics,” said Arneson.

The College is home to 14 academic different departments and programs including Anthropology, Criminal Justice, Cyber Security, Economics, Geography and Environmental Studies, History, Political Science, Psychology, School of Social Work and Sociology. Our faculty and staff are student-centered and are dedicated to providing friendly, personal guidance, and mentoring to our students. The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences (CSBS) is the largest College at Cal State, San Bernardino.

As Dr. Seuss says:  So… be your name Buxbaum or Bixby or Bray or Mordecai Ali Van Allen O’Shea, You’re off the Great Places!  Today is your day!  Your mountain is waiting.  So…get on your way!

For more information about The College of Social and Behavioral Sciences at Cal State San Bernardino call (909) 537-7500

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06.13.2017 The San Bernardino County Tobacco Control Program Comments Off on First, Second and Third-Hand Smoke Threatens Lives

First, Second and Third-Hand Smoke Threatens Lives

The San Bernardino County Tobacco Control Program serves in the capacity of local lead agency for tobacco prevention, education and control efforts in San Bernardino County. With funding support from the California Department of Public Health – Tobacco Control Program, SBCTCP is administered by the California Health Collaborative to implement a comprehensive tobacco control plan
Coalition Members left to right back row: Lynda Barbour, Susan Heppner, Evi Hernandez, Roberto Terrones, Clara Omogbai, Jennifer Harmon.  Front Row: Terry Roberts, Cynthia Turk, Maggie Acuna

 

(San Bernardino, CA) Where there’s smoke, there’s fire. Where there’s no smoke, there’s a firestorm.

Most people know that smoking and secondhand smoke are harmful to their health but very few are aware about the dangers of “third-hand smoke” exposure.

Third-hand smoke is the residue from tobacco smoke that accumulates on surfaces. It sticks to walls, windows and furniture or can settle as toxic dust in homes and cars. It even sticks to clothing and hair. The residue builds up in the environment, becoming more toxic over time, according to TobaccoFreeCA.com.

In San Bernardino County, the California Health Collaborative (CHC) has been crusading for tobacco-free apartment units since 2015. Through voluntary tobacco-free housing policies, CHC touts the benefits for renters, property managers and owners, said Roberto A. Terrones, Program Coordinator for San Bernardino County’s Tobacco Control Program.

Terrones said that many in the housing industry expect for tenants of apartment buildings to be against these types of tobacco free policies, but that is not the local nor state-wide sentiment when it comes to these changes. While there has been some blowback, he said, the majority of tenants appreciate the new rules.

“We survey the tenants before we go smoke free. Some people think these smoking policies aren’t popular but we’ve seen that a lot of people are for it,” Terrones said. “People that were opposed don’t always smoke but they see it as a right being taken away. We’re not telling you that you can’t smoke but you have to smoke somewhere else outside of the property.”

One-third of Californians live in multi-unit housing, according to the U.S. Census Bureau. Units share common walls, floors or a ceiling, which means that millions may be exposed to secondhand smoke even if they do not allow smoking in their home.

Nine out of 10 people do not smoke in their homes, Terrones said. About seven out of ten people who want tobacco free-housing are people that don’t smoke.

The importance of having tobacco-free housing is to protect the health of tenants, said Evi Hernandez, CHC Director of Program Services. Many times, Hernandez said, they are protecting people that cannot afford to live in single-family homes and those at highest risk for serious illness caused by tobacco smoke exposure, including children and the elderly.

“Among other things, any contact with third-hand smoke can cause skin irritation, trigger asthma attacks and lead to respiratory illnesses,” Hernandez said.” You don’t really see it in the form of smoke and if you’re not aware that it’s there, you can’t avoid it.”

Terrones said the county has been successful with subsidized housing because while many of the tenants’ love where they live, the smoke is killing them, he said. And for financial reasons, they are unable to move. “It’s essentially a trap,” Terrones said. “They can’t just pick up and leave because of their financial situation.”

Some have agreed to set aside a certain percentage of smoke-free units, but as Terrones said, “If you can smell what your neighbor is cooking, you can smell if they’re smoking.”

Long considered a health hazard, secondhand smoke seeps through doors, open windows, outlets and ventilation systems. The health benefits may be obvious, but decreasing the hidden financial costs are a bonus as well. Estimates to ready a unit for rent after a smoker has lived there could be in the thousands of dollars, Hernandez said.

“I’ve gone to these multi-complex houses and their blinds are completely yellow. You can’t get rid of the smell in the carpet. Sometimes the smoke is so pervasive it penetrates the walls and a treatment/paint plan can take weeks,” Terrones said. “It’s (another) benefit of multi-unit apartments to go smoke free.”

When an apartment complex goes tobacco-free, CHC offers a resource directory for tenants that includes local tobacco cessation resources and information about the California Smokers’ Helpline (1-800-NO-BUTTS).

For further information, contact the County of San Bernardino Tobacco Control Program at (909) 647-4532 or go to sbctcp.blogspot.com

 

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About The San Bernardino County Tobacco Control Program (SBCTCP)

The SBCTCP serves in the capacity of local lead agency for tobacco prevention, education and control efforts in San Bernardino County. With funding support from the California Department of Public Health – Tobacco Control Program, SBCTCP is administered by the California Health Collaborative to implement a comprehensive tobacco control plan that includes the following objectives:

1) Retain and engage community members representing diverse/priority populations and non-traditional partner agencies in the San Bernardino County Tobacco Control Coalition;

2) Partner with apartment managers/owners, apartment management companies, the Housing Authority of the County of San Bernardino, and tobacco control stakeholders to guide efforts that result in the adoption of smoke-free policies at multi-unit housing complexes; and

3) Coordinate efforts by incorporated cities in San Bernardino County to adopt a policy that eliminates sales and distribution of tobacco and/or electronic nicotine delivery devices (ENDD) products in pharmacies where licensed professionals provide health care services.

Program plan strategies were developed based on results of a community needs assessment and prioritization process and adhere to priority areas and guidelines set forth by the California Tobacco Control Program.

 

02.17.2017 Boy Scouts Comments Off on Bill Chamberlain and Terrence Stone Receive Boy Scout Honor

Bill Chamberlain and Terrence Stone Receive Boy Scout Honor

Bill Chamberlain Boy Scout Honor

Bill Chamberlain, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Raceway Ford will receive the 2017 Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award.

 

Terrence Stone Boy Scout Honor

Terrence Stone, Founder and Chief Operating Officer of Young Visionaries Youth Leadership will receive the 2017 Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award.

 

(San Bernardino, Calif.)  The Boy Scouts of America California Inland Empire Council will honor two men that have made it their personal mission to offer time and encouragement to youth that often fall through the cracks in their community.

Bill Chamberlain, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at Raceway Ford and Terrence Stone, Founder and Chief Operating Officer of Young Visionaries Youth Leadership will receive the 2017 Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award.

An awards breakfast is scheduled Friday, March 24, 7:30 a.m. at the Victoria Country Club, located at 2521 Arroyo Dr., in Riverside.

The Whitney M. Young Jr. Service Award is to recognize outstanding service by an individual for demonstrated involvement in the development and implementation of opportunities for youth from rural or low-income backgrounds – in fulfillment of American civil rights leader Dr. Young’s dream of justice and equality for all.

Proceeds from the breakfast will support the Assistance to Others Fund of the California Inland Empire Council, Boy Scouts of America. The charity is designed to help provide financial help for families in need of Scouting registration fees, handbooks, uniform needs and training.

Mentoring at-risk youth is Terrence Stone’s life work. Success is measured in many ways, Stone said, from a hug to a weekly paycheck. One of his best days was at a waterpark in Redlands, when he recognized a young man he’d mentored as an employee. Pride and joy only scratch the surface.

“We work with all kinds of kids, usually the ones that are the most challenging,” Stone said from his office in San Bernardino. “I love the fact that I’m involved in helping shape someone’s life at a young age, being an agent of change.”

In addition to local youths, Young Visionaries recently renewed its contract with area juvenile halls, offering a workforce development program that helps them get jobs when they leave the facility. They teach everything from how to dress, customer service and work ethic.

“Every kid out there needs something and they’re all different. The common denominator is they need to be needed and wanted,” Stone said. “That’s why gangs are growing. We must do a better job of listening to them and wanting to be with them.

“I love my job. It’s not even like a job. I still love Mondays. I get to go and do my thing. Always looking for ways to do it better.”

Bill Chamberlain chuckled about his stint as a Cub Scout, but it formed his love for service and for children and teens.

As a college student in 1972, Chamberlain first became a member of Big Brothers of America. He soon realized that it wasn’t about giving money as much as it was giving your time and your heart. In 1976 Bill was honored to be Big Brother of the Year in Philadelphia.  He is currently on the board of directors with Big Brothers and Big Sisters and helps raise funds for schools through  various philanthropic programs. To this day, he remains in touch with his first “brother.”

“I didn’t have kids of my own then and I always liked that organization. The volunteers that do it really have their heart in it,” Chamberlain said.

“They spend time with the kids. It was rewarding. It’s not all about having money to take them to Disneyland. We went to the park and threw the ball around. Just having somebody to buddy around with and someone that cares for them meant everything,” said Chamberlain.

Chamberlain is active in the Rotary Club of Riverside and has coordinated youth projects through their Interact organization. Currently, he raises money for veterans. Over the last 17years, the West Coast Thunder Motorcycle Ride, which he is president of, raised more than $800,000 for Riverside National Cemetery.

“We do a lot with young veterans, making them feel appreciated. Not like we did when we came home as vets (in the 70s). There are no protests against veterans now,” Chamberlain said. Even with grown children, Chamberlain still loves working with the area youth.

“For me, it’s a feeling of accomplishment knowing that these are the kids that are going to be running the world,” Chamberlain said. “It’s great to see the quality of kids out there. All you hear is ‘they (kids) only text, etc., but they’re great kids. And it’s nice to be recognized by an organization like the Boy Scouts.”

The California Inland Empire Council has been serving youth of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties for more than 93 years. The current council was formed in 1973 through the merger of four smaller areas.

The council has served hundreds of thousands of youth over the years, with its scouts and leaders providing innumerable hours of volunteer service to communities and individuals.

Council territory includes all of Riverside and San Bernardino Counties and stretches from Fort Irwin and Death Valley to Temecula and Indio; Ontario and Barstow to the Arizona and Nevada borders. The area served covers some of the fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the nation, National Parks and forests, rural farmland, military bases and open desert.

For more information, call Tracy Youden at (909) 793-2463, ext. 123.

To sign up online go to:  http://URL: http://www.bsa-ciec.org/registration/calendardetail.aspx?ActivityKey=2065128&OrgKey=21

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01.09.2017 The Salvation Army Comments Off on Planning for The Next Disaster

Planning for The Next Disaster

Amateur radios are not difficult to operate and greatly assist The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network in their communication efforts as they and other Salvation Army volunteers provide refreshment to firefighters on the front line.

 (San Bernardino, Calif.)  The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) holds its 21st Annual SATERN Disaster Preparation Seminar on Saturday, January 28, 2017.  The event is cosponsored by San Bernardino Corps. The location is: 2626 Pacific Street in San Bernardino.  Free parking is available on site.

 

The SATERN Seminar is an annual conference focused on amateur radio and emergency disaster preparation services for Riverside and San Bernardino Counties.  The seminar begins at 9:00 a.m. registration starts at 8:30 a.m. continues until 3:00 p.m.

 

“The SATERN seminar is open to all with an interest in amateur radio or an interest in emergency disaster services,” said Paul Hager Interim Coordinator for the riverside and San Bernardino Counties Section of SATERN.   “The seminar includes: presentations on emergency disaster services, responder safety and digital modes radio.  More information on the SATERN seminar can be found at www.satern.net.”

 

SATERN is the official emergency communications service of The Salvation Army.   SATERN is dedicated to assisting The Salvation Army during times of emergency.  To provide all possible forms of communications when normal communications are impossible, and through cross training, and assist The Salvation Army in any way possible.

 

“During a major disaster, such as an earthquake, flood or large, fire; there is a good chance that phone lines, cell towers and cable telephone systems will not be working,” said Major Daniel Henderson, Corps Officer.  “HAM radios will be one of the few ways to communicate disaster needs to the outside world.”

Paul Bennet practices emergency communications at a previous SATERN field day. During the event Ham Radio operators practice to provide the Inland Empire with communications during a disaster.

SATERN is a group of amateur radio operators willing to provide emergency communications support for The Salvation Army operations in local, regional, and international disaster and emergency situations.  SATERN has provided emergency communications support to The Salvation Army emergency disaster response since 1988.

 

“All who plan to attend must reserve a spot by emailing W1SAT@YAHOO.com   Your attendance includes a complementary lunch.  A free will offering will be taken to offset the cost of the lunch,” said Henderson.

 

For more information about SATERN go to the Riverside and San Bernardino Counties Section of SATERN’s web site www.satern.net or at the SATERN national web site www.satern.org.

 

For more information or to reserve a space for the event call Paul Hager at  909-499-0732 email: W1SAT@yahoo.com  or contact;  Steve Pinckney 909-888-1336 or steven.pinckney@usw.salvationarmy.org

 

Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY.  Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

 

 

About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army provides emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires and earthquakes.

 

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has served San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino.

 

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12.21.2016 The Salvation Army Comments Off on A Tradition of Christmas Service Continues at The Salvation Army

A Tradition of Christmas Service Continues at The Salvation Army

 

Daniel Herrera 12, Sonali Herrera 10, mother, Sujana Herrera volunteer to serve at the recent Thanksgiving dinner. They are from Riverside this is their second-year volunteering with The Salvation Army. The annual Christmas Dinner for hundreds of people is at 2626 Pacific St., in San Bernardino on Saturday, December 24 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

 

(San Bernardino, Calif.) The San Bernardino Salvation Army Corp (www.salvationarmyusa.org) hosts its annual Christmas Dinner for hundreds of people at its headquarters, 2626 Pacific St., in San Bernardino, CA 92346. This year, the Christmas dinner will be held on Saturday, December 24 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

“We share the joy and love of our God who sent his only begotten son, Jesus Christ, to save us from sin.  He taught use to love our neighbors as ourselves.  We share this Christmas meal and meals every day to show those in need that God truly cares for all of his children,” said Major Daniel Henderson, Citadel Corp director.

Since 1887, the annual San Bernardino Salvation Army Christmas dinner has served thousands of families, mothers, children and men who do not have the means to provide themselves a Christmas dinner.  Some just come to enjoy fellowship with others.

People come from Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino for this annual Christmas celebratory meal.   The dinner often serves more than 300 people.

“This year, guests will enjoy a turkey dinner with all the trimmings, containing potatoes, gravy, stuffing, vegetables, pie and other food received from donations,” said Lt. Cathie McCully.

“Every year, volunteers come together to provide the food preparation and service of Christmas meals to dinner guests,” said Major Daniel Henderson, Commander of The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corp. “Our volunteers and staff really do an outstanding job, to make a difference for those who are less fortunate during the holiday season.”

Many of the services provided by the Salvation Army, such as this annual Community Christmas dinner, are made possible through in-kind donations and money raised through the Red Kettle Bell Ringer campaign.  “It’s one of ministries your donations serve,” said Major Henderson.

Each Christmas, Inland Empire Salvation Army Corps in eight corps locations combine to serve about 1,800 people holiday meals.

The hungry families are joined by hundreds of volunteers who help prepare the food and serve meals to the families.  Along with asking volunteers to help serve food, the Salvation Army is encouraging people to donate turkeys or hams, side dishes and other food by calling (909) 888-1336.

“The San Bernardino Corps also needs food every day for those at our Hospitality House living shelter,” said Lt. Cathie McCully. Up to 100 family members stay in its transitional and emergency family shelters.

For more information about the Salvation Army Christmas dinner, donations or volunteering for the Christmas dinner at The Salvation Army near you, call or visit the locations below.

San Bernardino County

  • San Bernardino, 2626 Pacific Avenue, (909) 888-1336.
  • Ontario, 1412 S. Euclid Ave., (909) 986-6748.
  • Victorville, 14585 La Paz Drive, (760) 245-2545.
  • Redlands, 838 Alta St., (909) 792-6868.

 

Riverside County

  • Riverside, 3695 First Street, (951) 784-3571
  • Moreno Valley, 14075 Frederick St., (951) 653-9131.
  • Hemet, 340 S. Palm Ave., (951) 791-9495.
  • Murrieta, 4020 Los Alamos Rd., (951) 677-1324

To donate by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).  Donate on line at: WesternUSA.SalvationArmy.org

About The Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the universal Christian Church, and also offering holistic programs for people of all ages. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination.

The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

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12.21.2016 The Salvation Army Comments Off on It’s not To Late to Make A Happy Christmas for A Needy Child

It’s not To Late to Make A Happy Christmas for A Needy Child

 

Arlene and Priscilla Delgado, ages 4 and 8, each used their savings to purchase Christmas toys for a less fortunate child through the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corp’s Giving Tree program at Inland Center Mall. Help the Salvation Army obtain more toys for children in need by going to the Giving Tree by Dec. 24. Photo by Kelly Silvestri-Raabe

 

(SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.)  It’s not to late to make a Happy Christmas for a child.  Giving a toy to a needy child. It a small gesture, but participating in The Salvation Army’s Giving Tree will make this Christmas memorable for children in need.  Without your help, some children won’t get anything for Christmas.

“Just pick up an Angel Giving Tree tag and buy a needy child the gift listed on the tag! The Angel Giving Tree matches donors with hundreds of children who are relying on The Salvation Army this year to bring them a Merry Christmas,” said Major Daniel Henderson, Corps officer for the San Bernardino Salvation Army.

The San Bernardino Corps Giving Tree is at Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino, 500 Inland Center Drive in San Bernardino, 92408.  Donations received here provide toys to children from 300 disadvantaged families in San Bernardino, Rialto, Highland, Grand Terrace, Colton, Fontana and Bloomington.

“Please support disadvantaged children with a Christmas gifts at the Giving Tree by visiting our table in the Inland Center Mall and fulfilling the wishes of a child till December 24th,” said Lt Cathie McCully.

Shoppers find cards attached to the Giving Tree. These cards include the names and wish lists of needy children whose families cannot afford to buy gifts. Shoppers simply pluck a tag off the Giving Tree and head for the appropriate store to purchase their gift donations, then return it to the Giving Tree volunteers.

Shoppers get to keep the card as an ornament to hang on their own Christmas tree, reminding them of their good deed.

“This is a great way to start a tradition with your family, by selecting a gift for a needy child together. The gifts are based on their individual wishes and for some children, it may be the only gift they receive all year,” said Lt McCully.

“Soccer balls, dolls and clothes are just a few items on each child’s wish list,” said Major Henderson. “Shoppers who participate in the program are encouraged to shop for more than what is needed on the list. I can’t think of a better way for local people including business owners and managers to help the community and spread the spirit of Christmas.”

For more information on the Giving Tree call (909) 888-1336 or visit the tree in the Inland Center Mall in San Bernardino.   To donate money by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).  Donate on line at: WesternUSA.SalvationArmy.org

 

About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army may provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

 

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12.08.2016 The Salvation Army Comments Off on Keep The Bells Ringing This Christmas Season

Keep The Bells Ringing This Christmas Season

 

 

Photo 2 IMG_1652 Earl Perkins:  Mr. Earl Perkins stands with his kettle by the entry doors at the Food 4 Less market on Victoria Ave. and Highland Ave. in San Bernardino.   Earl is a Salvation Army Solider, and is in full uniform when he works. Earl has been with the Kansas City Salvation Army for over six years.  Earl moved to San Bernardino four months ago, and is now a member of the San Bernardino Corps.  Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

Photo 2 IMG_1652 Earl Perkins: Mr. Earl Perkins stands with his kettle by the entry doors at the Food 4 Less market on Victoria Ave. and Highland Ave. in San Bernardino. Earl is a Salvation Army Solider, and is in full uniform when he works. Earl has been with the Kansas City Salvation Army for over six years. Earl moved to San Bernardino four months ago, and is now a member of the San Bernardino Corps. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

 

(SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) The “miracle” of Christmas is repeated through the joy of caring and sharing. The San Bernardino Salvation Army (www.salvationarmyusa.org)  seek volunteers to Keep The Bells Ringing in Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino.

The nationally recognized shiny red kettle is an integral part of the Christmas scene, with millions of dollars donated each year to aid needy families, seniors, and the homeless, in keeping with the spirit of the season.

Photo 3 IMG_1590 Haskel and Claudia: Claudia Torres from San Bernardino and daughter Barbara, came by Macy’s to pick up some items, and decided to stop by the kettle to make a donation on her way out. Although Claudia had no idea what The Salvation Army uses the money for, she gave anyway. Claudia was informed all about the various ministries and how The Salvation Army helps feed the poor and homeless, and has a Transitional Living Center and Homeless shelter.

Photo 3 IMG_1590 Haskel and Claudia: Claudia Torres from San Bernardino and daughter Barbara, came by Macy’s to pick up some items, and decided to stop by the kettle to make a donation on her way out. Although Claudia had no idea what The Salvation Army uses the money for, she gave anyway. Claudia was informed all about the various ministries and how The Salvation Army helps feed the poor and homeless, and has a Transitional Living Center and Homeless shelter.

“This is a wonderful way to help disadvantaged people in our community, simply by volunteering as bell ringers,” said Major Daniel Henderson, commander of The Salvation Army of San Bernardino. “We’re looking for individuals, families and groups to spend a day at one of our more than 30 locations in our area.”

The Salvation Army began ringing its bells this year on Friday, Nov. 18 and continues from 10 a.m. through 6 p.m., Monday through Saturday until Christmas Eve.

Many volunteers ring two hours at a time, but groups are asked to provide ringers who can work in shifts for an entire day. Anyone who would like to donate a few hours of his or her time can volunteer.  Individuals under the age of 16 must be accompanied a parent or guardian.

Salvation Army Board member Carl Dameron rings the bells with his family.  Left to right: Malaika, Carl and Shaila.  Photo by Ricard Tomboc

Salvation Army Boardmember Carl M. Dameron Keeps the Bells Ringing with his family. Left to right: Malaika, Carl and Shaila. Photo by Ricard Tomboc

“The more people who volunteer, the fewer people the agency must hire,” said Major Henderson.  “Each volunteer who Keeps the Bells Ringing saves us $10 an hour.  That means more money raised in direct support of our services goes to families in need.”

Where does the money raised by the ringing bells in San Bernardino go?  The Salvation Army provides emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in  disasters such as fires and earthquakes.

For Christmas, the Salvation Army creates holiday food baskets for about 500 local families. On Christmas Eve, The Salvation Army of San Bernardino hosts a Christmas Dinner that historically provides a delicious meal to approximatly 300 people. Donations raised by volunteers who Keep The Bells Ringing  help make this possible.

The Corp has other need for your finial and food donations. “The San Bernardino Corps needs food every day for those at its Hospitality House and Transitional Living Center,” said Integrated Mission Coordinator Lieutenant Cathie McCulley.  Up to 100 family members stay in its transitional and emergency family shelters.

Photo 1 IMG_144 Shey Walmart:  Mr. Shey Holden takes his post at the front of the Walmart on Mt. Vernon Ave. in Colton.  Shey is a volunteer with The Salvation Army, and is planning on giving at least 30 hours this season.   Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

Photo 1 IMG_144 Shey Walmart: Mr. Shey Holden takes his post at the front of the Walmart on Mt. Vernon Ave. in Colton. Shey is a volunteer with The Salvation Army, and is planning on giving at least 30 hours this season. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

Up to 300 people who receive a free dinner served Sunday through Friday at 4:45 p.m. at The Transitional Living Center, 925 West 10th Street in San Bernardino. Your donations are needed to keep this program going.

To volunteer to Keep The Bells Ringing, call The Salvation Army at (909) 888-1336.

To donate to The Salvation Army online, go to: www.salvationarmyusa.org. To donate by phone call 1-800-SAL-ARMY (800-725-2769).

Donors may drop off turkeys, other food, cash or gift cards at the Salvation Army’s Corps Office at 2626 Pacific St., in San Bernardino, CA 92346, phone (909) 888-1336.

How the Bell Ringer campaign began:

Captain Joseph McFee, serving with the San Francisco Salvation Army Corps in 1891, wanted to serve Christmas dinner to the poor in his neighborhood. But he didn’t have money to do so.

As a sailor in Liverpool, England, Captain Mcfee saw people on the docks throw money into a large kettle called “Simpson’s Pot” to help the poor. He decided this might work in California too.

Captain Mcfee set up a kettle at the Oakland Ferry Landing, which operated a ferry that was, in those days, the only way across San Francisco Bay. He put a sign on the kettle saying “Keep the Pot Boiling” and raised enough money to serve the Christmas dinner.

His idea spread quickly, and by 1897 Salvation Army Corps nationwide were collecting money in kettles to serve the needy in their communities. Among the Salvation Army Corps collecting money this way before the turn of the 20th Century was The Salvation Army of San Bernardino, which formed in 1887.

 

About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and offers holistic programs for individuals of all. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has served San Bernardino and the Inland Empire  since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. The San Bernardino Corps of The Salvation Army serves Bloomington, Colton, Grand Terrace, Highland, Rialto, and San Bernardino.

Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local service number is (909) 888-1336.

Photo 4 IMG_1538 Haskel at Macys: Mr. Haskel Herndon is ringing his Christmas bell at the Macy’s department store at the Inland Center Mall.  Haskel greets every customer he comes in contact with.  Haskel opens the door for the ladies and for those with handfuls of packages!  Haskel has been a Soldier with the Salvation Army for 3 months now.  Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

Photo 4 IMG_1538 Haskel at Macys: Mr. Haskel Herndon is ringing his Christmas bell at the Macy’s department store at the Inland Center Mall. Haskel greets every customer he comes in contact with. Haskel opens the door for the ladies and for those with handfuls of packages! Haskel has been a Soldier with the Salvation Army for 3 months now. Photo By Ricardo Tomboc

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11.30.2016 LaSalle Medical Associates Comments Off on Avoid Getting Sick – Wash Your Hands Like A Doctor

Avoid Getting Sick – Wash Your Hands Like A Doctor

Consider these key facts about hand washing from the CDC: •One in three of adults in the U.S. do not wash their hands after using the bathroom. • One in four adults don’t wash their hands after changing diapers.

Consider these key facts about hand washing from the CDC:
• One in three of adults in the U.S. do not wash their hands after using the bathroom.
• One in four adults don’t wash their hands after changing diapers.

 

(San Bernardino, Calif.) Clean hands save lives! It’s a simple message repeated by health care providers and agencies, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), to avoid getting sick.

Keeping hands clean is one of the most effective ways to prevent the spread of infection and illness, such as the common cold and influenza, says Dr. Albert Arteaga, president of LaSalle Medical Associates.

As you touch people, surfaces, pets and objects, you accumulate germs on your hands, and although it’s impossible to keep your hands germ-free, washing your hands frequently can help limit the transfer of germs.

“Just think about all the things you touch everyday. You come in contact with germs all the time, so there are many opportunities to wash your hands,’’ says Arteaga.

Consider these key facts about hand washing from the CDC:

  • One in three of adults in the U.S. do not wash their hands after using the bathroom.
  • One in four adults don’t wash their hands after changing diapers.
  • Less than half of Americans wash hands after cleaning after pets.
  • One in three of adults wash hands after sneezing/coughing.
  • Less than one in five adults washes their hands after touching money.
  • One in three E. coli occurrences is caused from not washing hands before handling food.

How to Wash

“If hands are kept clean, the transmission of germs from person to person is greatly reduced,” Arteaga says. “But just holding your hands under running water won’t do the trick. There are proper techniques to follow,” he continued.

The best way to effectively eliminate most germs, Dr. Arteaga says, is to wash your hands with soap and water for about 15 to 20 seconds, followed by a good rinse.

“Be sure to wash the backs of your hands, between your fingers where germs can hide, and under your fingernails,’’ Dr. Arteaga says. “You must scrub your hands vigorously for at least 15 to 20 seconds to remove germs.”

For those concerned about time, Dr. Arteaga suggests looking no further than the “ABC Song.” He says singing the “ABC Song,” which is about 20 seconds in length, is not only effective in timing your own hand washing but is a unique way to help children develop their vocabulary skills and understand the importance of proper hand washing.

As an extra precaution, when using public restrooms, Dr. Arteaga suggests drying your hands with a paper towel, using it to turn off the water. Then, before discarding the paper towel, use it to open or close the bathroom door.

In the event a sink and or soap and water are not available, Dr. Arteaga suggests using an alcohol-based hand sanitizer gel or wipes, which are also effective in eliminating germs. But, Dr. Arteaga also points out, soap and water is still best in removing germs and bacteria.

“Many people use alcohol-based hand sanitizers, but if there is visible dirt on your hands, the alcohol-based hand sanitizers are not going to be as effective,’’ he says. “You need to use soap and water to rinse the dirt off your hands. If your hands aren’t visibly dirty, and you do not have soap and water available, make sure the hand sanitizer contains at least 60 percent alcohol to be effective in killing most germs and viruses.”

When to Wash

Wash your hands before and after you eat, use the toilet, change a diaper, touch an animal, blow your nose, cough or sneeze, handle garbage and touch a computer screen or telephone.

Dr. Arteaga says it is also good practice to wash your hands after visiting a park, entering our homes, and using our computers and telephones.

“Repetition is the mother of conversation,’’ he says. “The more you repeat something, the more it becomes ingrained in you to do it. So we must continue to instruct people on the proper way to wash their hands so that they don’t forget.”

Dr. Arteaga and his wife, Maria, a registered nurse, founded LaSalle Medical Associates 32 years ago. He and his team of 120 health care professionals treat thousands of patients for infectious diseases, such as the common cold and seasonal influenza each year.

Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Abert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

Maria and Dr. Albert Arteaga. The California Medical Association awarded Abert Arteaga the “Ethnic Physician’s Leadership Award,” recognizing his contributions to medical care in the Latino community.

LaSalle operates clinics in Fontana, Hesperia and San Bernardino.

LaSalle Medical Associates is an Independent Physicians Association (IPA), which has a membership of 1,900 health care professionals serving 190,000 patients in Los Angeles, Riverside, San Bernardino, Fresno, Kings, Madera, San Joaquin and Tulare counties.

For more information about LaSalle Medical Associates, call (909) 890-0407 or go on line to www.LasalleMedical.com.

 

About LaSalle Medical Associates

LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., operates four clinics employing more than 120 dedicated healthcare professionals, treating children, adults and seniors in San Bernardino County. LaSalle’s patients are primarily served by Med-Cal and Healthy Families and they also accept Blue Cross, Blue Shield, Molina, Care 1st, Health Net and IEHP. LaSalle’s clinics are at 17577 Arrow Blvd. in Fontana, 16455 Main St. in Hesperia and 1505 West 17th St. and 565 N. Mt. Vernon Ave. in San Bernardino.

LaSalle Medical Associates, Inc., is also an Independent Practice Association (IPA) of independently contracted doctors, hospitals and clinics, delivering high quality patience care with more than 190,000 patient visits per year in Fresno, Kings, Los Angeles, Madera, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Joaquin and Tulare Counties.

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11.21.2016 The Salvation Army Comments Off on Free Thanksgiving Day Dinner At The Salvation Army for 138 Years

Free Thanksgiving Day Dinner At The Salvation Army for 138 Years

 

Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez. We are ready for Christmas Dinners.

Volunteers serve Thanksgiving Dinner at The Salvation Army: Serving on the food line (left to right) is Nancy Veaegas, Niyahn Summey, Walt Summey, and Robert Sanchez. We are ready for Christmas Dinners.  Photo by Ricardo Tomboc.

 

(SAN BERNARDINO, Calif.) – Salvation Army chapters throughout the Inland Empire will serve Thanksgiving Day meals, to all that attend including those who are without fa ily or unable to provide a full-course turkey dinner for themselves.

The San Bernardino Corps has served Thanksgiving dinner for 138 years.

“We are pleased to prove God’s spirit of giving and provide a Thanksgiving Day dinner to those in need,” said Major Henderson, corps officer at the San Bernardino Corps. “We also welcome those who are familiar with the many other services we offer throughout the year.”

The San Bernardino Corps is the dinner at the Corps new headquarters at 2626 Pacific Avenue, San Bernardino, where it moved in August of 2015.

At many locations, including the San Bernardino Corps, these meals take place from 11 a.m.to 1 p.m., or until food runs out. Some locations will offer meals earlier and/or later in the day.

The Salvation Army relies mostly on donations, so food will vary somewhat at locations, but will include turkey or chicken, pies, stuffing or rice, cranberry sauce, pies, cakes, greens, and other side dishes.

“We always have plenty of donations for Thanksgiving, but if you’d like to bring some non-perishable food it is always welcomed,” said Major Henderson.

“In addition to our Thanksgiving Day meal, we serve dinners to about 75 homeless women and children every day, and to some 25 men who are currently taking advantage of our cold-weather shelter in the evenings,” said Lt. Cathie McCully

Chef Richie

The Cook Richie shows of his work sliced Turkey Brest ready to be served. Photo by Ricardo Tomboc

Six nights a week, we serve meals close to 200 hungry people, some who are homeless and some who have a place to live, but need help with food to pay for everything else.

“The Salvation Army, San Bernardino will be giving toys for hundreds of children and 600 families holiday food baskets a few days before Christmas,” said Lt. McCully

Other corps of The Salvation Army also plan Thanksgiving meals. Call one of the phone numbers listed below learn the time and location of meals in your area.

  • San Bernardino, 2626 Pacific Avenue, (909) 888-1336. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Riverside, 3695 First Street, (951) 784-3571. Wednesday, November 23 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Redlands, 838 Alta St., (909) 792-6868. Thursday, November 24 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
  • Moreno Valley, 14075 Frederick St., (951) 653-9131. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.
  • Ontario, 1412 S. Euclid Ave., (909) 986-6748. Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
  • Victorville, 14585 La Paz Drive, (760) 245-2545. The Victorville Corps has traditionally served two Thanksgiving dinners, one at its headquarters and another in Apple Valley at the James A. Woody Community Center on 13467 Navajo Road.  Both meals are served Thursday, November 24 from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Hemet, 340 S. Palm Ave., (951) 791-9495. Thursday, November 24th 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.

If you wish to be a volunteer to help the Salvation Army this Thanksgiving and Christmas season, please call The Salvation Army nearest you or call (909) 888-1336.

About the Salvation Army San Bernardino Corps

The Salvation Army may be able to provide emergency services including food; lodging for homeless or displaced families; clothing and furniture; assistance with rent or mortgage and transportation when funds are available. The Salvation Army Team Emergency Radio Network (SATERN) assists rescue workers and evacuees in such disasters as fires.

The Salvation Army is an evangelical part of the Universal Christian Church, and also offers evangelical programs for boys, girls and adults. One of the largest charitable and international service organizations in the world, The Salvation Army has been in existence since 1865 and in San Bernardino since 1887, supporting those in need without discrimination. Donations may always be made online at www.salvationarmyusa.org or by calling 1-(800)-SAL-ARMY. Our local number is (909) 888-1336.

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All photos by Ricardo Tomboc, Salvation Army board member